I. In Focus This Week

The picture of transparency
Dane County, Wis. puts cast ballot images online

By This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

Dane County, Wisconsin is taking the ballot selfie phenomena to a whole nother level.

For the first time, following the 2016 general election, the county posted images of all cast ballots online for anyone to view.

“I decided to post them in part because of claims of election tampering and fraud,” County Clerk Scott McDonell said. “Clerks in Wisconsin know this to be false, but it is often hard to disprove an accusation on social media. By posting images and allowing citizens and media to look at the raw data they can see the accuracy of the election for themselves.”  

Although the process is a bit in flux because the county has recently upgraded its accumulation software, but basically the files copied from the election media on to an external hard drive. Then loaded to the county server and made available on a share file site to the public.

Ballots from the November election were saved on ZIP files that, according to the Wisconsin State Journal, need to be opened with downloadable software on the site, but McDonell told the paper that he hopes to have the ballot images in a PDF format in the future.

Only the ballots fed through the machine on election night (early, day-of and absentee ballots) are included. Provisional ballots are not. The results from election night are also included for comparison.

Because the county is using voting equipment that can capture images of each ballot the only additional costs to post the ballots online is staff time. McDonell said during most elections that would be minimal, but could increase with high turnout races.

McDonell said he did speak with the Wisconsin Election Commission about posting the images.

“The only concern was ensuring the secrecy of the ballot, which we determined was preserved,” McDonell said.

Reid Magney, public information officer for the WEC said the commission has not publicly supported or discourage the posting of ballot images.

“Just like any document open to public inspection under the open records law, the government entity may choose to post those types documents on its website,” Magney said. “This allows the clerk to direct individuals to the website to retrieve requested information instead of having to respond to individual public records requests for the same information and spend the time and cost of preparing a disc or other medium to provide it.”

Pam Smith with Verified Voting said there are pros and cons to posting ballot images online. On one hand there is a fear that studying ballot patterns could lead to potential coercion. On the other hand it offers an opportunity to find a “bug” that may result in lost ballots as was the case in Humboldt County, California’s experiment with posting ballot images online.

Smith said a more important element is missing though.

“If Wisconsin conducts robust audits that limit the risk of a wrong outcome slipping through, audits that give authoritative confirmation that the outcome is correct, and does so in a transparent and observable way, that would be a much more valuable effort,” Smith said. “Right now Wisconsin's audits have no ‘teeth’; the goal of the audit is not to find and correct errors that could have altered the outcome, but instead to sanction a vendor if a specified error rate is not met. Better audits will give Wisconsin voters greater confidence.”

Since this was just the first time the county posted the images online, McDonell said there will be more to learn going forward, but that transparency is a good thing.

“We all know how accurate our elections are and having a way to prove that objectively is a very valuable thing,” McDonell said.

Another added bonus he said is that the raw data provided may prove useful to understanding trends and voting behavior.

McDonell said the feedback from posting the ballots online has been positive and the plans to continue to post them for future elections.

“The timing seems appropriate given the world we live in today,” he said.

No word yet though on what Chad Vader thinks of this latest development but McDonell said we could be hearing from him soon.

“Chad and I have had some conversations about getting the band back together,” McDonell said. “Not sure this will be the topic but stay tuned.”

 


 II. Election News This Week

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), chair of the House Oversight Committee announced this week that the committee will not investigate President Donald J. Trump’s unfounded claims of wide-spread voter fraud. "We can't just investigate everything that's ever thrown out there by the Democrats, by the Republicans. We have to pick and choose," Chaffetz said during an appearance on CNN.

The FBI has opened an investigation into an alleged data breach at Kennesaw State University’s Center for Election System that may have compromised as many as 7.5 million voter records. The university notified the state late last week. “After learning of this incident at Kennesaw State University, we reached out to law enforcement,” Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp said. “This matter is deeply concerning, but I am confident the FBI working with KSU will track down the perpetrator.”

Montana elections officials, still waiting to hear if the state will allow them to conduct an upcoming election solely by mail have run into another snag if legislators vote no. Turns out that the date chosen, May 25, is graduation day for many Montana high schools thus eliminating those buildings as polling places. For example, Missoula County Elections Administrator Rebecca Connors says seven of Missoula County's 28 polling locations could be changed. She says the changes could impact around 26,000 people.

The town of Plymouth, Vermont is being forced to take a mulligan on a local election due to a clerical error. The town was forced to shut down its election after about 500 residents because two ineligible poll workers were working the polls. “In my six years as secretary of state, this is the first time we've heard this one,” Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos told NECN. Russ Tonkin with the town select board said it was an honest mistake and that it’s often difficult to find poll workers. The re-vote will happen sometime in April.

Personnel News: Kathi Creed has been selected to serve on the Trumbull County, Ohio board of elections. Tom Ferrell has been appointed to the Erie County, Ohio board of elections. Angie Robson has been appointed director of the Meigs County, Ohio board of elections. Audrey Gillespie has joined the Miami County, Ohio board of elections. Don Mills has resigned from the Wisconsin elections commission. He will be replaced by Jodi Jensen. Democrat Katie Hobbs has announced that she will run for Arizona secretary of state. Hobbs is currently the Senate minority leader.

 


III. Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: Sens. Gary Peters (D-Michigan) and David Perdue (R-Georgia) have reintroduced the State and Local Cyber Protection Act that would increase cooperation between the Department of Homeland Security and state and local governments.

Also in Congress, Rep. Jerry Connolly (D-Va.) and Jim Langevin (D-RI) have introduced the Fair, Accurate, Secure and Timely (FAST) Voting Act which would provide federal grants to states to boost voting system security and increase voter access to elections. According to The Hill, the bill would let states compete for federal funding to implement policy changes aimed at increasing voter access to elections and boosting voting system security. The grants would be administered by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission.

Alaska: Smile! By a 32-8 vote, the House has approved legislation that would make it legal to take a selfie with your marked ballot and post it on social media. The bill heads next to the Senate.

Arkansas: If at first you don’t succeed you of course try again and that’s exactly what the Senate did this week. Early in the week the Senate rejected a bill to require voters to show a photo ID, but the bill was approved on a second try.

While legislation to approve voter ID moved forward, another measure, one that would put the question to the voters in 2018 was also approved.

California: Assemblyman Evan Low (D-Campbell) has introduced a constitutional amendment that would lower the state’s voting age from 18 to 17.

Assemblyman Rob Bonta has introduced Assembly Bill 918, the California Voting for All Act. Under the bill, eligible voters with limited English proficiency would be allowed to bring laminated translated voting ballots with them to the polling place.

Colorado: Cheese! By a 31-4 vote, the Senate has approved legislation that will allow ballot selfies in Colorado. While lawmakers had twice rejected bills to allow ballot selfies, this time both the Senate and the House have approved legislation that Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) has indicated he will sign.

Connecticut: Lawmakers debated two proposed constitutional amendments this week. One would allow no-excuse absentee voting and the other would allow for early voting.

Florida: Under House Bill 1325 local elections officials would not be able to extend polling hours. “[U]nless there is a specific showing or finding of fact that extraordinary circumstances exist to justify the extension,” that option would not be available to local supervisors of elections.

Also in Florida, a bill that would make the secretary of state an elected position instead of one appointed by the governor was approved by the Senate Committee on Ethics and Elections.

Idaho: The House Education Committee has killed a bill that would have made every election day in Idaho a school holiday. While the measure was created to protect the safety of students and staff who work in schools that serve in polling places, it drew strong opposition from school boards statewide.

Kansas: Sen. Anthony Hensley (D-Topeka) said that he plans to introduce legislation that would empower county commissioners to appoint county elections officials instead of the secretary of state.

Maine: The Veterans and Legal Affairs Committee deadlocked 6-6 on a bill that would require voters to show a photo ID to vote. The bill would require voters to display a photo identification issued by the state, the federal government, a Maine college or university, or an electronic benefits transfer – or EBT – card used for food stamps or other welfare benefits. Voters who cannot provide a photo ID could cast a provisional ballot, but that vote would only be counted if the person’s identity is subsequently confirmed.

Massachusetts: Republicans in the Massachusetts Senate plan to introduce a bill requiring the state to reimburse cities and towns for mandated costs related to early voting.

Michigan: House Bill 4328, which has been referred to the House Elections and Ethics Committee would legalize ballot selfies in Michigan. The bill would apply to ballots cast in-person at polling places or by absentee.

Minnesota: Initially introduced as a stand-alone bill (Senate File 1225) a measure to introduce provisional ballots to Minnesota has been rolled into a larger elections reform package (Senate File 514). Under the proposal, provisional votes would be cast, then set aside until a challenged voter’s eligibility is reviewed by election authorities and either affirmed or denied. Officials would have seven days to make that decision.

The House has approved $14 million in funding for counties to update voting equipment, but local elections officials say that is not nearly enough and is about half what they really need.

New Hampshire: One of the many election-reform bills making its way through the New Hampshire Legislature is one that would bar anyone who comes to New Hampshire only for “temporary purposes” from voting in the state. This includes anyone here for less than 30 days for vacation, short-term work on volunteer work.

The House of Representatives approved a variety of election-related bills on Thursday, including a measure to step up enforcement of unverified voter affidavits by turning the process over to the Secretary of State. The House also passed HB 430, which requires local election officials to keep track of voters using an out-of-state driver’s license as proof of identity when voting, by a vote of 187-160. An automatic voter registration bill was defeated as was a bill that would allow any voter to vote by absentee ballot.

Nebraska: According to the Lincoln Journal-Star, LR1CA, a constitutional amendment which would require voters to show a photo ID may be headed for a filibuster showdown.

Nevada: By a 3-2 partisan vote a Senate committee approved automatic voter registration legislation. The bill now moves to the full Senate where it is expected to pass.

Ohio: By a 32-0 vote, the Ohio Senate has approved SB 10 which would allow counties to eliminate uncontested primary races from ballots. In addition, special primaries for open congressional seats would not be held if only one candidate qualifies for the ballot.

Oregon: Senate Bill 683 would require the state to pay postage for all mail-in ballots at a cost of about $650,000 per year. If approved, it would go into effect in 2019.

Rhode Island: Rep. Robert Nardolillo (R-Coventry) said he plans to introduce a resolution in the Rhode Island House of Representatives urging the U.S. Congress to rework the federal Motor Voter Act to allow states to require proof-of-citizenship to register to vote.

Utah: By 59-12 with bipartisan support, the House has vote to approve HB349 which would implement ranked choice voting in multi-candidate primaries. However, with a 3-3 tie a Senate committee voted to kill the bill.

In other news, the House voted 26-45 to kill HB314 which would have required mail-in ballots arrive at a county clerk’s office on or before Election Day.

Also in Utah, a Senate committee has approved legislation in support of automatic voter registration. The bill would change the current opt-in system to an opt-out system. The bill was approved 5-1 and now moves to the full Senate.

Washington: The Senate voted 34-15 to move the state’s presidential primary from May to early March beginning in 2020. The approval came despite some complaints that the bill only addressed the presidential primary and not the entire primary system.

Although no cases of ballot box vandalism have been reported, lawmakers have approved legislation to protect ballot drop boxes. The bill defines the removal, destruction or damage of a drop box or its contents as malicious mischief. It upgrades the crime to a Class C felony with a penalty of up to five years in prison, a $10,000 fine or both.

West Virginia: The House has approved legislation that will allow electioneering as close as 100-feet from the entrance to a polling place, including during early voting. The current law is 300 feet and was approved in 1986.

Also in the House, the Judiciary Committee worked through a new voter ID bill and sent it down to a subcommittee for further review. The bill, if approved, would require residents to show a valid driver’s license, state ID card, passport or passport card, an employee ID card or any other government agency ID or military card. It would ban use of high school or college IDs, birth certificates, SNAP ID cards, utility bills, bank cards, etc. as allowed under current law.

 


 IV. Legal Updates

Federal Litigation: U.S. District Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia has ruled that it’s up to the U.S. Election Assistance Commission to decide whether its executive director exceeded his authority when he allowed three states to change a national mail voter registration form to include a proof-of-citizenship requirement.

Colorado: The Colorado Court of Appeals has sent back to district court a lawsuit challenging fees collected by the secretary of state’s office to fund elections. The National Federation of Independent Businesses sued claiming that business-filing fees are taxes because they are used for non-business-related functions. The appeals court on Thursday asked Secretary of State Wayne Williams’ office to determine whether there have been any fee hikes since 1992 that possibly could be subject to the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights.

Also in Colorado, Toni Newbill has pleaded guilty to voting twice in the 2016 primary. She cast her own ballot and attempted to cast a vote for a person who died in 2012.

Florida: Manuel Alejandro Angulo, 29, has been charged with one count of falsely registering a non-citizen to vote, a third-degree felony. A nonpartisan voter outreach group Angulo worked for contacted the elections department when they discovered what he had been doing.

Georgia: Hancock County has agreed to restore the voting rights of dozens of African-American registered voters they disenfranchised ahead of a 2015 election. About three-quarters of the people they removed from the voting rolls — nearly all of them black — still live in the voting district and will be restored to the county's registered voter list under the settlement.

Iowa: Fifth Judicial District Judge Porter has reversed a 2012 reprimand of former Johnson County Auditor Tom Slockett. Porter wrote that the Iowa Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board did not prove Slockett, who served until 2012, wasted county money when he took campaign calls in his county office.

Kansas: Oral arguments were held recently in the case against proof-of-citizenship for voter registration. During oral arguments, attorneys representing voters denied registration asked for summary judgment in their companion cases, rather than going to trial. They argued that evidence already on the record proves that elements of the law were unconstitutional.

Maine: Briefs have been submitted by Maine’s attorney general, legislative Republicans and others in the lawsuit against the voter approved measure to move the state to ranked-choice voting. A trial date is set for April.

Minnesota: The U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Minnesota’s law of banning political apparel at polling places does not infringe on First Amendment rights. The case arose after members of the Minnesota tea party work “Please ID Me” buttons to the polls in 2010 and they were asked to remove the buttons.

Also in Minnesota, three felons have been charged with knowingly voting as an ineligible person in the 2016 general election. All three are accused of voting before they had completed probation for felony convictions. All also reportedly said they did not know they were ineligible to vote.

Ohio: The Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless, the Columbus Coalition for the Homeless and the Ohio Democratic Party are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on a years-long challenge to Ohio’s provisional and absentee ballot rules. The homeless advocates argue that a pair of 2014 laws adding requirements for absentee and provisional ballots unfairly disenfranchise minority voters.

Also in Ohio, Rebecca Hammonds has been sentenced to 180 days in jail for voter fraud. Hammonds was found guilty of falsifying voter registration records including registering people to vote who had already died.

Rhode Island: The Cranston police is investigating eight criminal cases of illegal voting including two non-citizens who voted in Cranston; two people who voted twice in one Cranston elections; a person who voted in Cranston as well as Providence; and an imposter who voted in Providence. According to The Providence Journal there is no suggestion that the illegal votes swayed any election.

Texas: U.S. District Judge Ricardo Hinjosa has denied motions to dismiss a case against Starr County Elections Administrator Rafael Montalvo. The American Civil Rights Union sued the county alleging that the number of people registered to vote in the county is more than the number of those who are eligible and of voting age.

Also in Texas, Noe Olvera, 43, a former mailman, has admitted to selling lists of mail-in voters to political operatives in Hidalgo County. According to KURV, Olvera acknowledged taking $1,000 to provide the list.

 


 V. Tech Thursday

National Tech: The U.S. Election Assistance Commission has certified ES&S’ EVS 5220 end-to-end voting system. This certification introduces the DS450 high-throughput scanner & tabulator as well as enhancements to the ExpressVote (third party activation barcode acceptance and two column layout)

Mississippi: Election commissioners in Oktibbeha County are hoping county supervisors will approve a $28,000 request to purchase about 30 e-poll books. The county currently uses large paper voter rolls and that creates problems with split precincts. “Almost every (precinct) has at least one split, with congressional, justice court (and other positions). Our county has more splits than any other county in the state. Some elections, we have had as many as 14 splits at the larger precincts," Greg Fulgham, District 1 election commissioner told The Dispatch

 


 VI. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voting rights, II, III, IV, V, VI | Automatic voter registration; Voter ID | Voting security | Voter suppression | Ex-felon voting rights

California: Voting changes

Colorado: Election security

Connecticut: Early voting

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights

Iowa: Election integrity bill, II

Minnesota: Voter fraud | Provisional ballots

Missouri: Voter ID, II

Montana: Mail ballots, II, III, IV, V, VI

New Hampshire: Voter fraud | Election legislation, II | Ballot selfies

New Mexico: Registration deadlines

Ohio: Voter fraud

Oregon: Voter registration | Secretary of state

Texas: Voter ID, II, III | Advance ballots

Virginia: Voter rolls

 


 VII. Upcoming Events

The Changing Trends in Elections — a special workshop from the Election Center where you will hear from colleagues and stakeholders in the election process covering issues such as the Electoral College debate, voter registration and litigation update, modernization of the voter registration process, media review of the 2016 election and polls and media projections impact on election administrators, changes and trends with vote-by-mail and other USPS issues, the 2015 American Community Survey, polling place accessibility and much more. Where: Columbus, Ohio. When: April 26-28.

The Future of Elections: Technology Policy and Funding — Join legislators, legislative staff, elections officials and election administration experts for a discussion on the future of elections technology and how to pay for it. Share ideas on updating voting infrastructure in an era of limited resources and heightened security concerns. In addition to a robust discussion on elections policy, attendees will enjoy all Colonial Williamsburg has to offer. Bring the whole family with you! When: June 14-16. Where: Williamsburg, Virginia.

IaoGO 2017 Annual Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the International Association of Government Officials 2017 Annual Conference. When: July 6-13, 2017. Where: Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin.

NASS 2017 Summer Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of Secretaries of State 2017 Summer Conference. When: July 7-10, 2017. Where: Indianapolis, Indiana.

NASED 2017 Summer Meeting— Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of State Election Directors 2017 Summer Meeting. When: August 22-25, 2017. Where: Anaheim, California.

 


VIII. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Account Manager, Clear Ballot, Boston — we are looking for a talented Account Manager to play an active role in developing and maintaining long-term working relationships with Clear Ballot’s customers. This person should be able to work independently and in partnership with other team members to achieve high customer satisfaction. The account manager will have a regional assignment, with certain customers assigned to him/her. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and dedicated Customer Relations Manager to join our team! This is remote position that can be based in either Ohio or Pennsylvania. In this role, you will be responsible for providing world-class customer service to our customers in Ohio and Pennsylvania in order to achieve our core purpose of delivering solutions for the advancement of fair, accessible, and secure elections! You will problem solve, collaborate, create and improve processes, and make our customers successful in the execution of seemingly impossible tasks. Excitement lives here! Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Service Consultant, Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is seeking a Customer Service Consultant who has a strong desire to provide an outstanding customer experience for a growing company. Our Customer Service Consultant supports our customers on a daily basis by providing the following: Foster and develop positive customer relations by providing courteous, prompt and proactive customer service. Communicate with customers by phone, email or other correspondence. Respond to customer requests in a timely manner. Ensure timely Order Fulfillment through interactions with customers, other internal departments, and vendors: Create price quotations, orders, and similar requests for customers. Process purchase orders and enter purchase information into Order Management System. Verify all purchase orders and order information for accuracy. Contact customers to verify the information on purchase orders as it may be appropriate. Provide customers with assistance and information on part numbers, order status, troubleshooting their purchase orders, or other requests. Act as a liaison and coordinate with other departments through order completion and to expedite or resolve any issues or concerns. Provide follow up and respond to customer issues, inquiries, emails, correspondence, or other requests. Assist in maintaining up to date customer files. Partner with other departments to prepare documentation to process returns and credit memos. Partner with other departments to process requests for internal orders, including capital expenditure requests. Maintain a current working knowledge of product lines, prices, lead-time, and other relevant information. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Maricopa County, Arizona — administers comprehensive elections programs for Maricopa County.  Coordinates the timely electronic, mechanical, and/or by-hand count processing, verification and reporting of elections results in cooperation with other county, state and federal agencies.  Supervises the recruitment, training, and evaluation of election workers and staff.  Develops, administers and coordinates election division budgets.  Manages vendor relationships, procurement processes, and the Elections Department warehouse.   Reviews existing and proposed changes to election law, rules and regulations and oversees the implementation of changes to Election Department processes.  Provides feedback on proposed changes in law effecting the Elections Department.  Maintains security, auditing and accountability of all election materials and equipment, and related support resources.  Establishes policies and procedures to ensure the effective and efficient operation of the Elections Department.  Participates in the development of new and improved concepts and procedures for the most effective use of IT equipment, techniques, and best practices to improve efficiency of Elections Department functions.  Analyzes and develops recommendations for needed revisions, adjustments or creation of voting precincts.  Collects, analyzes and reports statistical election data to the County Recorder; and in conjunction with the County Recorder, to county, state and federal agencies and press.  Acts, as directed, as a spokesperson for the Elections Department in addition to interfacing with public, as needed. Salary: $97,281-$157,123. Deadline: April 30. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections/Recording Manager, Clallam County, Washington — this is a full- time (40 hours per week), union, retirement and benefits eligible position. To plan, organize, coordinate, and carry out all phases of the election process in accordance with Federal, State, and County laws; assure the efficient and effective utilization of personnel, funds, materials, facilities and time; accomplish short-term and long-range goals; implement and maintain sound organizational practices to assure optimum services to the community; and to perform related duties as assigned. Accountable to the County Auditor for the efficient and effective performance of election employees and volunteers through delegation of duties and responsibilities during the election process. Responsible to assure that all election activities are performed in accordance with the requirements of RCW Title 29A and standards set by the Secretary of State. Errors in judgment and performance would adversely impact election results, public relations and legal liabilities. Individuals in this position must apply a thorough and complete knowledge of election procedures, processes and laws. Accountable to the county auditor for the efficient and effective performance of the recorder. Salary: $4202-$5122/monthly. Deadline: March 22. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack .Net Developer, Dominion Voting Systems, Toronto, Ontario — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a highly technical and passionate Full Stack .Net Developer to join our team in downtown Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to design development, coding, testing and debugging of new voting system software and/or significant enhancements to existing software. This position will work on a team utilizing an Agile development environment. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Specialist, Denver, Colorado — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a tech-savvy, passionate Product Specialist to join our team in downtown Denver! This position will be responsible for providing technical support on all Dominion Voting Systems products both on-site, via the telephone or via email; write detailed, technical documentation for distribution internally and externally; and interface directly with customers, co-workers, and election officials. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Southeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Southeastern United States; preferably in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, or Louisiana. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Northeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Northeastern United States; preferably Illinois, Ohio or New York. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (West), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Western United States; preferably California. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and technically skilled Sales Engineer to be based in either California or Colorado. This position will be responsible for serving Dominion Voting Systems customers by identifying their needs; working with Engineering & Certification on adaptations of existing DVS products, equipment, and services; and this using technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying our products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Senior Software Engineer to be responsible for building and enhancing enterprise level web applications using JavaScript to create rich, dynamic and visually appealing experiences.  You should have expert knowledge of python, JavaScript and MySQL, as well as experience with various operating systems (Windows 10, Linux Ubuntu). The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills utilizing the latest concepts in front-end development, including responsive techniques, accessibility and client-side frameworks. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build a platform that is changing the elections industry. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Technical Trainer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — our small and growing documentation and training team has an immediate need for a new member with intermediate-to-senior experience in: Instructional design, development of learning curricula, production of training materials, and hands-on, customer facing training. Generally, the training department, technical staff, and operations staff provide training at the customer’s site. We need an instructional designer and trainer who can analyze the learners and materials, and establish an appropriately targeted learning program. The opportunity exists to develop computer based training as an enhancement to our learning curriculum. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — we are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 


 IX. Marketplace
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 X. Election Underwriting

For almost 15 years, electionline.org has brought you all the election administration reform news and information of the day through electionlineToday and of the week through our weekly newsletter electionlineWeekly.

Because of the generosity of such organizations as The Pew Charitable Trusts, Democracy Fund and the Hewlett Foundation we were able to bring you that news and information for free and free of advertising.

In order to continue providing you with the important news of the day and week we are now offering monthly underwriting for our daily and weekly postings (think more NPR, less local radio and television).

Underwriting will be available for electionlineToday, the weekly email that reaches about 4,800 inboxes each week and the weekly newsletter. Underwriting is available on a per-month basis and costs $2,500 per section per month. The underwriting is available on a first come, first-served basis. Each section will be exclusive to one underwriter per month.

We will accept underwriting from a variety of entities in the elections world, but will not accept political advertising.

Job posting and marketplace listings from elections offices seeking to sell/trade voting equipment will remain free of charge.

Reservations are now available. If you are interested in underwriting a section of election for a month (or more), please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.