I. In Focus This Week

Get them while they’re young
California 16- and17-year-olds can now pre-register online

By This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

According to a study by the Pew Research Center, 92 percent of teens report going online daily — including 24 percent who say they go online “almost constantly.”

With that in mind, California is bringing Muhammad to the mountain by allowing 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote using the state’s online voter registration portal.

“Online pre-registration will help more young people vote as soon as they are eligible. Whether they’re at school or at home or hanging out with friends, young Californians can pre-register to vote in just minutes in their smartphone, tablet or laptop,” said Secretary of State Alex Padilla.

California is one of 10 states and the District of Columbia that allows 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote and also one of 34 states and the District of Columbia that allows people to register online to vote. As far as we know, it’s the only state that allows those pre-registrants to use the online portal. [Update: Massachusetts and Utah also allow pre-registrants to do so online. Thanks to our alert readers for letting us know!]

CA pre regIn 2014, Governor Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 113 by Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) which allowed voter pre-registration beginning at age 16 once the California’s statewide voter registration database, VoteCal, was certified.

Pre-registration has been offered on paper voter registration forms since VoteCal was certified in September 2016. Technical upgrades to California's online voter registration system were required before online pre-registration could be offered. 

While there were no additional costs to the state to make this switch, there were some programming changes to VoteCal and the OVR system that needed to be made in order to handle the pre-registrants.

Any 16- and 17-year-old that is eligible to vote (U.S. citizen, California resident, not in jail or on parole, etc.) is eligible to use the online system. If the registrant doesn’t have a signature on file with the state’s DMV — either through a driver’s license or state ID card — will need to complete the process online, then print a form, sign it and send it to their county elections office.

To avoid any confusion like what was reported this week in Wisconsin, county elections offices will mail confirmation post-cards to those who are pre-registered as soon as they turn 18 to notify them that they are now eligible to vote.

Pre-registrants can use the online portal on any smart phone, tablet or computer and they can use the portal the same way registered voters do to update addresses.

The state launched their “Pre-Register at 16, Vote at 18” campaign at Los Angeles-area high school and plans to work with civic engagement organizations, elected officials, school districts and education groups to get the work out about the new online opportunity. They will of course rely heavily on social media outreach too.

“We are also planning to contact teachers who have participated in our Mock Election program. We will continue to promote the ‘Pre-Register at 16, Vote at 18’ campaign during California’s high school voter education weeks, National Voter Registration Day, and support legislation to include pre-registration in the high school curriculum,” said Sam Mahood, press secretary for the secretary of state’s office

As of the week of the launch, there were 15,430 pre-registrants in California. Only time will tell how much that number grows.

 


 II. Election News This Week

There were two storms brewing in New Hampshire this week. While snow, sleet and wind pounded the Granite State some local clerks were at odds with the secretary of state and the governor when they chose to cancel town elections because they were scheduled for Tuesday during the height of the late-winter blizzard. A lawyer for the New Hampshire Municipal Association said the towns have the authority to make the decision themselves to postpone elections while the secretary of state’s office insisted that voting could not be postponed. "There is some differing opinion on the state level as to ... whether that is a valid process for them to take," Gov. Chris Sununu told SeacoastOnline. "Given that there are differing opinions, the best we can do is strongly recommend that all towns stay open for voting…." Numerous town postponed their elections till later this week and through the weekend, but some did remain open for voting and for those that did, voters arrived any way they could.

Kids grow up so fast these days and last election season in Wisconsin, a few 17-year-olds took that just a step too far by casting ballots in the primary election although they were not eligible. While some states do allow 17-year-olds who will be 18 at the time of the general election vote in the primary, Wisconsin is not one of those states. According to a report from the Wisconsin Elections Commission, at least 60 17-year-olds voted. Reid Magney, spokesman for the commission told the Wisconsin State Journal that he’d never seen this issue crop up before and believes that the teens were likely encouraged to go to the polls by messages on social media. The cases have been referred to local prosecutors but it is unclear if they will result in any prosecutions.

A report by the Kansas Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says that the state’s proof-of-citizenship requirement and voter ID law “may impose substantially higher burden than that which has been previously challenged in the U.S. Supreme Court.” The advisory committee report says that research has found that stricter ID and registration requirements can suppress voter participation. It goes on to say that a preliminary analysis of Kansas turnout data “suggests that voter participation declined following the implementation of the SAFE Act.”

Congratulations to Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate who won the National State Boards of Education Award for Outstanding Leadership in Voter Education. Pate was recognized for his efforts in conducting two statewide Iowa Youth Straw Polls and the Iowa Youth Caucus. “Our congratulations to Secretary Pate and his staff on their hard work teaching the next generation to carry the torch of liberty,” Gloria Kirshner, president of National Student/Parent Mock Election organization said in a statment. “Our mission is to light a fire in the hearts of our young, empowering them to preserve and protect government of the people, by the people and for the people for generations to come, and Secretary Pate’s efforts in Iowa align perfectly with that mission.” The Iowa Youth Straw Polls were the culmination of Caucus 101 and Elections 101. Those are free, online, social studies curricula developed by Secretary Pate and written by Iowa teachers for Iowa students. They are available for anyone to use at Elections101.org.

The John S. and James L. Knight foundation this week announced renewed support to two separate nonprofit organizations — Democracy Works and the Center for Technology and Civic Life — to help increase voter participation in elections and break down barriers to civic engagement through technology. Democracy Works will receive $2.5 million to expand its work in college and corporate outreach as well as expand its work with election officials by launching the Election Technology Cooperative. The Center for Technology and Civic Life will receive a grant for $508,000 to continue CTCL’s work in training municipal officials to use digital tools for community outreach and elections planning.

And our sympathies to Charlotte County, Florida Supervisor of Elections Paul Stamoulis. As reported by UPI a driver “cutting through” a Florida Wal-Mart parking lot accidentally hit the gas instead of the brake and her car ended up atop Stamoulis’ classic 1959 Corvette. The story notes that Stamoulis remained calm throughout the ordeal and if that’s case, we’re pretty convinced he must be downright stoic on an election night. Here’s hoping it’s not a complete loss.

Personnel News: After 22 years on the job, Chesterfield County, Virginia’s Registrar Larry Haake is retiring effective April 1 (seriously). South Dakota Secretary of State Shantel Krebs has announced that she is running for Congress. Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp has indicated his plans to run for governor although there has been no official announcement. Also in Georgia, State Rep. Buzz Brockway (R-Lawrenceville) has announced his plans to run for secretary of state in 2018. Linda Smith is retiring as the Klamath County, Oregon clerk. She was first elected in 1999. Congratulations to Eileen McCracken, Hingham town clerk, for being named citizen of the year. Congratulations are also in order for Sebastian County, Arkansas Clerk Sharon Brooks who received the National Association of Secretaries of State Medallion Award.

 


 III. Research and Report Summaries
electionline provides brief summaries of recent research and reports in the field of election administration. The summaries are courtesy of This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., project management specialist with the U.S. Election Assistance Commission.

America Goes to the Polls 2016: A Report on Voter Turnout in the 2016 Election – Prepared by Nonprofit Vote and the U.S. Elections Project, March 2017: This report examines voter turnout in the 2016 presidential elections and finds:

  • 60.2 percent of the nation’s 231 million eligible voters cast ballots compared to 58.6 percent in 2012.
  • Five of the six states with the highest turnout were battleground states.
  • Minnesota, Maine, New Hampshire, Colorado, and Wisconsin had the highest turnout while Hawaii, West Virginia, Texas, Tennessee, and Arkansas had the lowest turnout.

The report also looks at the impact of same day registration on turnout, youth turnout, reasons for non-voting, and the how competitive races were for the U.S. House.

The Business of Voting: Market Structure and Innovation in the Election Technology Industry - Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative, University of Pennsylvania, March 2017: This report provides an overview and analysis of the current state of the election technology industry and vendors in the market. In doing so the authors also examine barriers to innovation and strategies election officials can use in navigating this market. 

 


 IV. Legislative Updates

Alabama: The House has voted unanimously for a bill that would define what criminal convictions should disqualify a person from voting. The bill names 42 crimes ranging from murder to forgery as crimes of moral turpitude.

Arkansas: The Senate as approved a bill that expands the list of places people may carry a concealed handgun including polling places. The bill had stalled in the Senate Judiciary Committee, but the Senate approved a motion to bring it before the full body.

Delaware: Rep. Earl Jaques (D-Glasgow) is trying again to remove language from the state constitution that requires voters to show a valid excuse for obtaining an absentee ballot. Because it’s a constitutional change it will require 2/3 of the General Assembly to approve it in two consecutive years.

Florida: A bill that would allow voters to fix mismatching signatures on their vote-by-mail ballot has cleared the House Government Accountability Committee by a unanimous vote. The bill now heads to the full House. There is no Senate companion bill at this time.

The House Oversight, Transparency & Administration Subcommittee voted unanimously to approve HJR 811 that would place the issue of whether or not the state’s top elections official should be elected or appointed by the governor as is currently the case.

Idaho: Legislation to change Idaho’s procedure for special elections when an Idaho member of Congress leaves office mid-term cleared a Senate panel on Monday, and headed to the full Senate. Under the bill, there would be both a primary election and a general election. When a vacancy occurs, the governor would have to pick one of the four existing Idaho election dates for the primary.

A bill that would limit early voting in Idaho has died in the Senate State Affairs Committee.

Illinois: Lawmakers in the Senate are moving Senate Bill 1933, a new version of automatic voter registration. If approved, and signed by the governor, it would take effect July 1, 2018. Under this new bill, qualified residents would automatically be registered to vote when they visit the Illinois Secretary of State and other state agencies for services. Additionally, there would be checks in place to ensure no one is registered to vote who should not be.

Iowa: The House has approved Secretary of State Paul Pate’s election integrity bill which would in addition to other things, require a voter to show a photo ID (or a state-issued voter registration card which will be automatically provided to those without a driver's license or non-driver's ID) in order to cast a ballot.

Kansas: Members of the House Elections Committee tacked an amendment onto a Senate bill that proponents say would make election offices in the state’s largest counties accountable to the people they serve. The local elections officials would be elected positions instead of appointed by the secretary of state.

Missouri: A Missouri bill would require the Department of Health and Senior Services to create a system notifying election authorities when someone has died therefore permitting them to take the dead person off the voter rolls.

Montana: As counties continue to prepare for the May 25 special election how they replace Secretary Zinke remains up in the air. Senate Bill 305, which would allow counties to conduct the election by mail has been sent a committee that Sen. Steve Fitzpatrick (R-Great Falls) calls the kill committee. Fitzpatrick said the House Judiciary Committee has some of the most ideological representatives. The committee and full House have about two weeks to approve the bill and get it to the governor for his signature.

Nebraska: The secretary of state’s office and the Nebraska Department of Motor Vehicles testified against proposed legislation that would create a system of automatic voter registration in Nebraska. Colleen Byelick, general counsel and chief deputy for the Secretary of State’s Office argued that AVR would flood the state’s voter rolls with ineligible voters.

Nevada: By a 12-9 party-line vote, the Nevada Senate has approved legislation that would allow residents to be automatically registered to vote when getting a new or renewing their license. It is unclear whether or not Gov. Sandoval will sign the bill.

Also in Nevada, lawmakers are consider a bill to amend the state’s constitution to make it unconstitutional to intimidate a voter.

New Hampshire: On a party-line vote the Senate killed a bill that would have allowed for online voter registration in the Granite State. Arguments against the bill included that it would have been too expensive to implement.

Also in New Hampshire, the Senate has approved a bill to allow towns and cities to participate in an e-poll book trial program.

New Jersey: A bill has been introduced to the Assembly that would require all new voting machines purchased or leased to produce a paper record of each vote cast.

New Mexico: A bill that would have allowed someone to register to vote up to three days before an election has been killed in a Senate committee. The voter registration deadline in the Land of Enchantment will remain 28 days prior to an election.

Also in New Mexico, an amendment to House Bill 174 that would consolidate most local elections into one would now allow cities to opt out and continue to hold their own election.

By a 9-4 vote the House Judiciary Committee has rejected House Bill 206 which would have opened the state’s primaries to independent voters.

Oregon: A bipartisan bill — House Bill 2731 — has been introduced to include Oregon in the National Popular Vote inter-state compact. Legislation has been introduced before, 2009, 2013 and 2015, but was unsuccessful.

South Carolina: Sen. Mike Fanning has proposed legislation that would require any elected official who is convicted of a crime and must resign their seat to pay for the special election to fill that seat. The proposal would require solicitors to ask for that restitution, and it would authorize judges to order it.

Texas: The Senate Affairs Committee voted 7-0 to send Senate Bill 5 to the full body. The bill would add options to voters who say they cannot “reasonably” obtain one of the seven forms of acceptable ID. It would also allow voters over 70 to show an expired license as ID.

Virginia: Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) has vetoed House Bill 1428 that would have required any voter submitting an application for an absentee ballot by mail or by fax to also submit a photo copy of their valid photo ID.

McAuliffe has also vetoed a bill (HB 2343) that would have required the state Department of Elections to provide local registrars with a list of voters who, according to data-matching systems, have been found to be registered in another state. “This bill would invite confusion and increase the possibility of violating federal law,” McAuliffe said in his veto statement. “Moreover, it would expose eligible and properly registered Virginians to the risk of improper disenfranchisement.”

Washington: Legislators are considering a bill that would change the voter registration deadline to 11 days prior to an election instead of the current 29 days.

 


 V. Legal Updates

Alabama: Elbert Melton, 69 Mayor of Gordon has been arrested on three counts of absentee voter fraud, a class C felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison. He won his election by 16 votes.

California: In a report entitled “No Voter Fraud Here: The Transparent Election Process,” an Orange County grand jury says it conducted a thorough review of the local voting system and found no signs of significant fraud in the recent election.

Florida: A suit has been filed against Gov. Rick Scott (R) and three elected cabinet members by the Fair Elections Legal Network on behalf of seven ex-felons. The suit seeks to end Florida’s “unconstitutionally arbitrary” system for restoring the civil rights of convicted felons. The lawsuit says 1.6 million Floridians are currently disenfranchised, the most of any state, and that more than 10,000 are awaiting public hearings on their restoration applications.

Illinois: Steveland Kidd, 29 of Alorton has plead guilty to voter fraud charges in the April 2013 election. He was charged with two counts of violating absentee ballots. He was sentenced to 12 days in county jail and is barred from electioneering or campaign activities.

Louisiana: State District Judge Tim Kelly has ruled that more than 700,000 Louisiana residents on probation or parole for felony crimes will remain disenfranchised. Kelley called it unfair to keep thousands of people from voting if they're working, paying taxes and following the law. But he said Louisiana's constitution and a four-decades-old state law required him to continue denying the voting rights. "I don't like this ruling. I don't like it. It's not fair," Kelley said via the Associated Press.

Nevada: Under a court-ordered agreement, the state of Nevada and Washoe and Mineral counties have agreed to pay $60,000 in legal fees to the Pyramid Lake and Walker River Paiute tribes. The tribes won a federal lawsuit against the state and counties to provide early voting to the tribes.

Texas: In a 2-1 ruling a panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Republicans redrew Texas’ congressional map to intentionally discriminate against Latino and black voters.

Virginia: Walter Mason, mayor of Waverly, has been indicted on 12 counts of felony election fraud. According to the indictments, Mason "unlawfully and feloniously, willfully make a false statement or entry on an absentee ballot application," four different times between February and April of 2016. He is also accused of helping seven people "in a violation of absentee voting procedures."

 


 VI. Tech Thursday

Georgia: A group of 20 technology experts have written a letter to Secretary of State Brian Kemp urging that, following a suspected data breach, the state should stop using electronic voting machines and should switch to paper-based balloting. Elections officials are rejecting the call.

New York: The New York City board of elections is seeking $1.3 million from the city council to upgrade cybersecurity measures. The money would cover 16 new staffers to implement and maintain an upgraded cybersecurity system.

Ohio: The Seneca County board of commissioners have appropriated $54,000 for the county’s board of election to purchase e-poll books. The BOE has chosen the KnowInk-produced Poll Pad. The county will purchase 55 e-poll books and hope to have them in place by the May 2 election.

 


 VII. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voter rolls | Voter fraud | Voting Rights Act

Arizona: Top-two primary

California: Voting age, II | Nevada County

Colorado: Colorado Springs | Pierce County | Ballot selfies, II

Connecticut: Early voting

Florida: Voter fraud

Georgia: Hancock County

Indiana: Voter ID

Iowa: Election integrity bill, II, III, IV

Maine: Ranked choice voting

Missouri: Voter ID

Montana: Special election, II, III

Nevada: Ex-felon voting rights

New Hampshire: Election legislation | Election restrictions

New York: Voting modernization, II

North Carolina: Same day registration

Ohio: Lucas County, II

Oregon: Paid postage, II | Secretary of state

South Carolina: Special election costs

Texas: Pasadena voting rights | Voting rights

Vermont: Transparency

Virginia: Prince William County

Washington: Election system

 


 VIII. Upcoming Events

The Changing Trends in Elections — a special workshop from the Election Center where you will hear from colleagues and stakeholders in the election process covering issues such as the Electoral College debate, voter registration and litigation update, modernization of the voter registration process, media review of the 2016 election and polls and media projections impact on election administrators, changes and trends with vote-by-mail and other USPS issues, the 2015 American Community Survey, polling place accessibility and much more. Where: Columbus, Ohio. When: April 26-28.

The Future of Elections: Technology Policy and Funding — Join legislators, legislative staff, elections officials and election administration experts for a discussion on the future of elections technology and how to pay for it. Share ideas on updating voting infrastructure in an era of limited resources and heightened security concerns. In addition to a robust discussion on elections policy, attendees will enjoy all Colonial Williamsburg has to offer. Bring the whole family with you! When: June 14-16. Where: Williamsburg, Virginia.

IaoGO 2017 Annual Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the International Association of Government Officials 2017 Annual Conference. When: July 6-13, 2017. Where: Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin.

NASS 2017 Summer Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of Secretaries of State 2017 Summer Conference. When: July 7-10, 2017. Where: Indianapolis, Indiana.

NASED 2017 Summer Meeting— Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of State Election Directors 2017 Summer Meeting. When: August 22-25, 2017. Where: Anaheim, California.

 


 IX. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Account Manager, Clear Ballot, Boston — we are looking for a talented Account Manager to play an active role in developing and maintaining long-term working relationships with Clear Ballot’s customers. This person should be able to work independently and in partnership with other team members to achieve high customer satisfaction. The account manager will have a regional assignment, with certain customers assigned to him/her. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and dedicated Customer Relations Manager to join our team! This is remote position that can be based in either Ohio or Pennsylvania. In this role, you will be responsible for providing world-class customer service to our customers in Ohio and Pennsylvania in order to achieve our core purpose of delivering solutions for the advancement of fair, accessible, and secure elections! You will problem solve, collaborate, create and improve processes, and make our customers successful in the execution of seemingly impossible tasks. Excitement lives here! Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Service Consultant, Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is seeking a Customer Service Consultant who has a strong desire to provide an outstanding customer experience for a growing company. Our Customer Service Consultant supports our customers on a daily basis by providing the following: Foster and develop positive customer relations by providing courteous, prompt and proactive customer service. Communicate with customers by phone, email or other correspondence. Respond to customer requests in a timely manner. Ensure timely Order Fulfillment through interactions with customers, other internal departments, and vendors: Create price quotations, orders, and similar requests for customers. Process purchase orders and enter purchase information into Order Management System. Verify all purchase orders and order information for accuracy. Contact customers to verify the information on purchase orders as it may be appropriate. Provide customers with assistance and information on part numbers, order status, troubleshooting their purchase orders, or other requests. Act as a liaison and coordinate with other departments through order completion and to expedite or resolve any issues or concerns. Provide follow up and respond to customer issues, inquiries, emails, correspondence, or other requests. Assist in maintaining up to date customer files. Partner with other departments to prepare documentation to process returns and credit memos. Partner with other departments to process requests for internal orders, including capital expenditure requests. Maintain a current working knowledge of product lines, prices, lead-time, and other relevant information. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Maricopa County, Arizona — administers comprehensive elections programs for Maricopa County.  Coordinates the timely electronic, mechanical, and/or by-hand count processing, verification and reporting of elections results in cooperation with other county, state and federal agencies.  Supervises the recruitment, training, and evaluation of election workers and staff.  Develops, administers and coordinates election division budgets.  Manages vendor relationships, procurement processes, and the Elections Department warehouse.   Reviews existing and proposed changes to election law, rules and regulations and oversees the implementation of changes to Election Department processes.  Provides feedback on proposed changes in law effecting the Elections Department.  Maintains security, auditing and accountability of all election materials and equipment, and related support resources.  Establishes policies and procedures to ensure the effective and efficient operation of the Elections Department.  Participates in the development of new and improved concepts and procedures for the most effective use of IT equipment, techniques, and best practices to improve efficiency of Elections Department functions.  Analyzes and develops recommendations for needed revisions, adjustments or creation of voting precincts.  Collects, analyzes and reports statistical election data to the County Recorder; and in conjunction with the County Recorder, to county, state and federal agencies and press.  Acts, as directed, as a spokesperson for the Elections Department in addition to interfacing with public, as needed. Salary: $97,281-$157,123. Deadline: April 30. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections/Recording Manager, Clallam County, Washington — this is a full- time (40 hours per week), union, retirement and benefits eligible position. To plan, organize, coordinate, and carry out all phases of the election process in accordance with Federal, State, and County laws; assure the efficient and effective utilization of personnel, funds, materials, facilities and time; accomplish short-term and long-range goals; implement and maintain sound organizational practices to assure optimum services to the community; and to perform related duties as assigned. Accountable to the County Auditor for the efficient and effective performance of election employees and volunteers through delegation of duties and responsibilities during the election process. Responsible to assure that all election activities are performed in accordance with the requirements of RCW Title 29A and standards set by the Secretary of State. Errors in judgment and performance would adversely impact election results, public relations and legal liabilities. Individuals in this position must apply a thorough and complete knowledge of election procedures, processes and laws. Accountable to the county auditor for the efficient and effective performance of the recorder. Salary: $4202-$5122/monthly. Deadline: March 22. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack .Net DeveloperDominion Voting Systems, Toronto, Ontario — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a highly technical and passionate Full Stack .Net Developer to join our team in downtown Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to design development, coding, testing and debugging of new voting system software and/or significant enhancements to existing software. This position will work on a team utilizing an Agile development environment. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS (Mapping) Specialist, Fort Meyers, Florida — Lee County Supervisor of Elections is seeking a full-time Geographical Information Specialist to maintain our county precinct map.  Using MapInfo in conjunction with our voter registration (Voter Focus).  Successful applicant will help diagnosis system problems, correct or initiate corrective action through other technicians, consultants, vendors, technical manuals or supervisors. Qualifications: Five years minimum of Map Info project management, software development and applications support experience and three years or more of experience with Voter Focus or a comparable voter registration system; or any equivalent combination of education, training, and experience which provides the requisite knowledge, skills, and abilities for this job. Salary: $45,000-$70,000. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Specialist, Denver, Colorado — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a tech-savvy, passionate Product Specialist to join our team in downtown Denver! This position will be responsible for providing technical support on all Dominion Voting Systems products both on-site, via the telephone or via email; write detailed, technical documentation for distribution internally and externally; and interface directly with customers, co-workers, and election officials. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Southeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Southeastern United States; preferably in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, or Louisiana. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Northeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Northeastern United States; preferably Illinois, Ohio or New York. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (West), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Western United States; preferably California. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and technically skilled Sales Engineer to be based in either California or Colorado. This position will be responsible for serving Dominion Voting Systems customers by identifying their needs; working with Engineering & Certification on adaptations of existing DVS products, equipment, and services; and this using technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying our products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Senior Software Engineer to be responsible for building and enhancing enterprise level web applications using JavaScript to create rich, dynamic and visually appealing experiences.  You should have expert knowledge of python, JavaScript and MySQL, as well as experience with various operating systems (Windows 10, Linux Ubuntu). The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills utilizing the latest concepts in front-end development, including responsive techniques, accessibility and client-side frameworks. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build a platform that is changing the elections industry. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Technical Trainer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — our small and growing documentation and training team has an immediate need for a new member with intermediate-to-senior experience in: Instructional design, development of learning curricula, production of training materials, and hands-on, customer facing training. Generally, the training department, technical staff, and operations staff provide training at the customer’s site. We need an instructional designer and trainer who can analyze the learners and materials, and establish an appropriately targeted learning program. The opportunity exists to develop computer based training as an enhancement to our learning curriculum. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — we are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 


 X. Marketplace
electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


 XI. Electionline Underwriting

For 15 years, electionline.org has brought you all the election administration reform news and information of the day through electionlineToday and of the week through our weekly newsletter electionlineWeekly.       

Because of the generosity of such organizations as The Pew Charitable Trusts, Democracy Fund and the Hewlett Foundation we were able to bring you that news and information for free and free of advertising.

In order to continue providing you with the important news of the day and week we are now offering monthly underwriting for our daily and weekly postings (think more NPR, less local radio and television).

Underwriting will be available for electionlineToday, the weekly email that reaches about 4,800 inboxes each week and the weekly newsletter. Underwriting is available on a per-month basis and costs $2,500 per section per month. The underwriting is available on a first come, first-served basis. Each section will be exclusive to one underwriter per month.

We will accept underwriting from a variety of entities in the elections world, but will not accept political advertising.

Job posting and marketplace listings from elections offices seeking to sell/trade voting equipment will remain free of charge.

Reservations are now available. If you are interested in underwriting a section of election for a month (or more), please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.