I. In Focus This Week

There’s no there there
NASS releases facts and findings on cybersecurity in 2016 electio

By This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

Rigged! Hacked! Tampering! Fraud!

Even before one vote was cast in the 2016 election, rumors swirled about the integrity of the election. The cacophony of misinformation and innuendo has not stopped since the election and all of this has caused some Americans to lose faith in the electoral system.

In the days leading up to the election a survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that only 4 in 10 Americans had a high degree of confidence that their votes would be counted correctly nearly a third of all who responded thought there was a great deal of voter fraud in the country despite the lack of evidence.

This week, the National Association of Secretaries of State released the State Election Officials Report Facts & Findings on Cybersecurity and Foreign Targeting of the 2016 U.S. Election.

The report is an effort by NASS to help improve voter confidence and show for a fact that the election was not “hacked”.

As Congress examines the impact of Russian involvement in the November 2016 election, it is important to provide the clearest and most accurate public record possible regarding election cybersecurity and foreign targeting of U.S. election infrastructure. The following findings are based on all unclassified documentation and evidence available to the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS):

The November 2016 election was NOT HACKED.
The voting process was not hacked or subject to manipulation in any way. No credible evidence of hacking, including attempted hacking of voting machines or vote counting, was ever presented or discovered in any state, including during recount efforts that took place after the election. A joint DHS-DNI report details the foreign cyberattacks that took place against U.S. government, political and private sector entities that were attributed to Russia.2 Election officials remain concerned by unfounded conjecture that a lack of such tangible evidence indicates that hacking might have been overlooked or hidden from discovery, despite collaborative efforts with our intelligence services, cybersecurity firms, network defenders and state and local officials.

Russian intrusions into state and local election boards in 2016 were limited to TWO INCIDENTS that did not involve systems used in vote tallying.
The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), along with state officials, are aware of two confirmed intrusions into government-owned voter registration databases that took place in summer 2016. The FBI has confirmed that foreign-based hackers attempted to mine data from voter registration systems in Arizona and Illinois, but no voter registration data was modified or deleted.4 In Arizona, a hacker attempted to probe voter registration data via a county-level infiltration, but was blocked from doing so by the system’s controls. In Illinois, hackers were able to access publicly-available voter files. These incidents prompted the FBI to warn state election offices to increase their election security measures for the November 2016 election.

Additional state voter registration systems were targeted by cyber hackers, but NO ADDITIONAL SYSTEMS were accessed or breached.
U.S. intelligence agencies have confirmed that Russian-based “cyber scanning or probing activities” were discovered against state voter registration systems, but this targeting does not equate to gaining access or actual breaches. Claims that twenty or more states experienced Russian-led hacks or intrusions into their election systems are false and inaccurate. Furthermore, while it is theoretically possible to disrupt an election via networked systems, compromising voter registration systems would not affect election results. Election registration databases are not linked to vote counting.

Just OVER HALF of all states took advantage of voluntary cybersecurity assistance provided by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security confirmed to NASS that 33 states and 36 county jurisdictions had taken advantage of the agency’s voluntary assistance and services by Election Day on November 8, 2016. NASS and DHS also achieved a joint goal of ensuring that all 50 states were notified of the federal government resources that were available to them upon request. DHS services included cyber hygiene scans on Internet-facing systems, risk and vulnerability assessments and resources identifying recommendations to improve online voter registration systems, election night reporting systems and other Internet-connected systems. Those states that did not seek to utilize DHS assistance received similar or more comprehensive support from their own state networks.

Our highly-decentralized, low-connectivity elections process provides BUILT-IN SAFEGUARDS against large-scale cyberattacks; however, states are strengthening their systems for future elections.
Our national intelligence agencies concurred with secretaries of state in concluding that our diverse and locally–run election process presents serious obstacles to carrying out large-scale cyberattacks to disrupt elections, and that standalone, disconnected voting systems present a low risk. States are now working together to reinforce their preparedness against future cyber threats, most notably by replacing aging voting equipment. To assist in these efforts, the NASS Election Cybersecurity Task Force will advance collaboration on the unique priorities and challenges that exist regarding election cybersecurity. NASS is also supportive of a thorough accounting and resolution of documented instances of unauthorized scanning against several states’ election networks that has been attributed to IP addresses utilized by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

 


 II. Election News This Week

Happy 26th Amendment Day y’all! March 23 marks the 45th anniversary of the passage of the 26th Amendment which lowered the nation’s voting age from 21 to 18. West Virginia Senator Jennings Randolph lead the initiative to lower the voting age. Over 29 years, Randolph introduced legislation 11 times to lower the voting age. Finally in 1971 by a 94-0 vote the Senate supported the initiative and the House followed suit with a 401-19 vote. Three-fourths of the states had ratified the amendment by July 1, 2971.

This has just not been New Hampshire’s month. Last week towns across the state battled a blizzard and state officials over local elections and this week the town of Lisbon is scrambling to figure out how to hold its rescheduled election after three members of the town’s Board of Selectmen resigned on the eve of the election. State law requires that a majority of the board be present at voting sites without the three, the town didn’t have a majority. The state allowed the town to swear in three temporary members just for Tuesday’s voting. "We met the legal requirements for the voting, and we're voting today, which is good,” Town Moderator Robert Cook told WMUR. “So we're feeling good about that."

Colorado Springs Clerk Sarah Johnson is reminding voters to unfold their ballots in order to vote for everything on it. The ballot contains three issue questions and one candidate question and some voters have called to express confusion and a few have returned the ballots without casting a vote for the candidates.

Congratulations to the Alabama Secretary of State’s office for being a winner of the National Association of State Boards of Education Award for Outstanding Leadership in Voter Education from The National Student/Parent Mock Election. “We’re honored to receive this award,” Secretary of State John Merrill said in a statement. “Voting is one of the most fundamental rights we receive as American citizens, and it is our duty to teach the next generation the importance of that right as early as possible. The Alabama Votes Student Mock Election provided teachers and parents with the necessary materials and opportunity to share the voting experience with their students, which will benefit them in the near future when they reach the legal voting age.”

Personnel News: Nebraska Secretary of State John Gale has announced that he will not seek re-election in 2018. He is currently in his 17th year as secretary. Rochelle Long has been appointed interim clerk in Klamath County, Oregon. Ken Lawrence is now the chair of the Montgomery County, Pennsylvania election board. Johnson County, Iowa Auditor Travis Weipert is considering a run for secretary of state. Kevin Smith has been appointed to the Lake County, Indiana board of elections and registration. Marlene Jensen has retired as the Bingham County, Idaho elections director. Scott Hourigan has been appoint chairman of the Salem County, New Jersey board of elections. Betsy Hundley is preparing to retire as the longtime elections coordinator for Livingston County, Michigan. Congratulations to Kentucky Secretary of State Allison Lundergan Grimes for being named the Kentucky Communicator of the Year by the Kentucky District of the National Speech and Debate Association. Dawson County, Georgia board of elections member Tom Foley has retired.

 


 III. Research and Report Summaries
electionline provides brief summaries of recent research and reports in the field of election administration. The summaries are courtesy of This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., project management specialist with the U.S. Election Assistance Commission.

Voter Identification Laws and the Suppression of Minority Votes - Zoltan Hajnal, Nazita Lajevardi, and Lindsay Nielson, The Journal of Politics, January 2017 and Comment on “Voter Identification Laws and the Suppression of Minority Votes" - Justin Grimmer, Eitan Hersh, Marc Meredith, Jonathan Mummolo, and Clayton Nall, March 2017: Hajnal, Lajevardi, and Nielson examine the impact of voter ID laws on voter turnout. They find that strict voter ID laws cause a large turnout decline among minorities, particularly Latinos. Grimmer et al critique this research and find the results are due to large data inaccuracies and that the conclusions about the impact of voter ID are not supported.

 


 IV. Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: Reps. Mark Pocan (Wis.), Keith Ellison (Minn.) and Hank Johnson (Ga.) introduced the Securing America’s Future Elections (SAFE) Act, which would launch several cybersecurity programs, including codifying the decision from former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson to reclassify elections as critical infrastructure. 

Arizona: HB-2339 would change the way the state reimburses the cost of holding a presidential preference elections. Current law allows the state to reimburse the counties up to $1.25 per voter, but under the new legislation that reimbursement would rise to up to $3.50 per voter.

Also in Arizona, the Senate has approved a bill that would make it more difficult to get citizen-lead initiatives onto the ballot. The bill would make it easier to challenge signatures and prohibits signature gatherers from getting paid.

Arkansas: Both chambers have now approved HB 1047 that would require a voter to show a photo ID in order to vote. Gov. Asa Hutchinson is supportive of voter ID, but said he would have to review the legislation before signing it.

California: Assemblymembers Shirley Weber (D-San Diego) and Todd Gloria (D-San Diego) have introduced a bill that would allow county boards of supervisors to change how their district boundaries are drawn and require all supervisor races to a runoff between the top-two candidates in the primary.

Colorado: Senate Bill 71, which would reduce the required number of voting centers during the first week of early voting, was approved upon second reading this week.

Delaware: Under House Bill 89, the state’s primary elections would be held the same day as the presidential primary, the fourth Tuesday in April.

District of Columbia: Councilmember Charles Allen (D-Ward 6) has introduced legislation that would permanently move the city’s primary elections to the third Tuesday in June. Although the 2016 primary was held in June that was only a temporary move. This legislation would make that move permanent.

Florida: Rep. Emily Slosberg (D-Boca Raton) announced her plans to file an amendment to a germane bill that would stop candidates from being inside a voter’s home while the voter is completing their vote-by-mail ballot. The action follows a newspaper investigation that found candidates helping voters fill out their ballots.

Georgia: The Senate has approved a bill that would require information on voter-registration applications to exactly match state or federal databases in order for the voter to cast a ballot. Under the bill , people couldn’t be added to the voting rolls unless information on their application exactly matches records tied to their Georgia driver’s license or identification card or the last four digits of a Social Security Number. Without an exact match, people could only cast a provisional ballot and their application could be rejected after 26 months if they’re unable to resolve the conflict.

Guam: Senator Joe San Agustin has introduced a bill that would do away with state-run primaries and instead allow the parties to conduct their own primaries before sending those candidates to the Election Commission for the general election.

Hawaii: A bill is making its way through the Senate that would create statewide vote-by-mail by 2020. The bill has already been approved by the House.

Illinois: The Senate Executive Committee has approved a new automatic voter registration bill by a 10-3 party line vote.

Indiana: The House Elections Committee has voted 8-3 to require consolidation of Lake County’s numerous small precincts. Under the proposed legislation, which now heads to the full House, requires county officials to create a bipartisan plan to merge as many precincts as possible that have fewer than 600 active voters.

Kansas: The House Elections Committee has approved a bill that would prevent county elections officials from moving the location of a polling place without sending prior written notification to those affected at least 30-days in advance of the election.

Kentucky: Senate Bill 145, approved by the Senate and now under consideration by the House, would allow counties to place statewide, local option questions on primary or general election ballots. Counties would no longer have to hold separate special elections on county-wide issues such as alcohol sales.

Nebraska: A hearing was held last week on two election-reform bills. LB619 would allow counties to hold all-mail elections and LB277 would change the maximum number of people per precinct from 1,750 to 1,000.

Nevada: Senate Majority Leader Aaron Ford has introduced a bill that would allow nonviolent felons to vote one year into their probation or parole. The bill has been approved by the Senate judicial committee.

Gov. Brian Sandoval (R) has vetoed legislation that would have allowed voters to be automatically registered to vote when getting or renewing a driver’s license. Voters will now take up the issue as a statewide ballot measure in November 2018.

Assembly Bill 274 would have Nevada join the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact if approved.

New Hampshire: Following a recent blizzard and when several towns chose to postpone their elections, Democrats have introduced a bill to protect those towns from lawsuits for postponing their elections.

Also in New Hampshire, the Senate has OK’d a bill that would allow the state to hire a full-time attorney to enforce state election laws. That is currently done by a half-time employee.

By a 3-2 vote the Senate Election Law Committee has vote to send a bill to the full Senate that would tighten ID requirements for people who register to vote within 30 days of election. Under the bill, a person who registers to vote within 30 days of an election or on Election Day must show verification that a New Hampshire address is his or her domicile.

New Mexico: The Senate has approved legislation that will consolidate most local elections, but it will give cities and towns the ability to opt-out. The Senate approved the bill 28-10 and the House concurred with changes made by the Senate. It is unclear whether the governor will sign the legislation or not.

New York: A bill has been introduced into the Assembly that would fine voters who fail to cast a ballot $10.

North Dakota: Legislation is under consideration that would legal residents to vote on election day using a set-aside ballot and then return with a valid ID within six days. The bill would also expand the types of ID that can be used.

Pennsylvania: Sen. Vincent Hughes (D-Philadelphia) has announced plans to introduce legislation that if approved, would automatically register residents to vote.

Tennessee: By a 69-20 vote, the House has approved legislation that would offer a $1,000 reward for reports leading to the conviction of voter fraud. The legislation would also impose an additional $1,000 fine on those convicted of voter fraud. The legislation had originally sought a $5,000 reward/penalty. The Senate’s version of the bill has yet to be taken up in committee.

Texas: Rep. Mark Keough has pulled his bill, House Bill 288, that would have shrunk the early voting period from 12 days to seven. A representative for Keough said the bill was pulled because the attorney general had expressed concerns about it.

Utah: Gov. Gary Herbert (R) has signed legislation into law that would require county clerks to come up with a plan to manage wait times for future elections. Herbert has also signed a bill that will allow county clerks to offer early voting up to Election Day. He has also approved legislation that will move Utah to a primary system for 2020.

The Provo municipal council voted 6 to 1 to contract with Utah County to handle the city’s vote-by-mail elections beginning with this year’s primary. The city of Springville still has to make a decision.

 


 V. Legal Updates

Arizona: The U.S. Supreme Court has rebuffed a bid to void the system of nominating Tucson’s council members by ward and instead have them elected at-large. The high court gave no reason for their ruling.

Also in Arizona, Maricopa County and Project Vote have reached a settlement in a suit filed by Project Vote to seek to see how the county determined who was removed from the voter rolls in advance of the 2016 election. The recorder’s office will turn over an electronic list of more than 2 million voter registrations.

Arkansas: Gov. Asa Hutchinson has signed a bill into law that will expand where people may conceal carry including in polling places.

California: Donald Dewsnup has pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges of giving incorrect information on his voter registration form.

Colorado: Steve Curtis, 57, former head of the Colorado Republican Party, has been charged with voter fraud and forgery.

Connecticut: Judge Anthony Truglia has ruled that Brookfield must cover the legal fees for former Republican Registrar of Tom Dunkerton in a suit over his role in expelling a resident from the GOP.

Georgia: U.S. District Court Judge Timothy C. Batten Sr. has dismissed a lawsuit that accused Secretary of State Brian Kemp of illegally bumping voters of the state’s voter rolls ahead of the 2016 election. In the 21-page decision, Batten said the state had taken a “reasonable and nondiscriminatory” approach in trying to reach voters who had not cast a recent ballot to confirm their addresses.

New Jersey: The Ocean County board of elections has been served a subpoena to deliver “any and all records for George R. Gilmore related to his position as Chairman of the Election Board of Ocean County for the time frame January 1, 2010 to the present…”

New York: A New York Supreme Court judge has dismissed a voter registration lawsuit filed by Freeport municipal election candidates. The candidates had sued alleging that residents who have died or no longer live in the village remain on Nassau County’s voter rolls.

Texas: Jason Preston Gross, 37 of Dublin, Texas has been indicted on a second degree felony voter fraud charge in Erath County. Gross is accused of voting twice in the November 2016 election. "I am really impressed that (county clerk) Gwinda Jones and her team caught this," District Attorney Alan Nash told the Stephenville Empire-Tribune. "Mr. Gross was interviewed by police and openly admitted that he wanted to support his presidential candidate." Gross' second ballot was not counted in the official election results. A second degree felony is punishable by imprisonment for not more than 20 years or less than two years.

 


 VI. Tech Thursday

Georgia: According to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Kennesaw State University officials received a warning before the November election that a server used by the election center may be vulnerable. The university did not notify the state of the potential data breach until a second hacker contacted them. A spokeswoman for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, who is said to have been furious at university officials for not telling his office about the contacts before this month, said he has confidence in how the presidential election was run and that additional data checks by the office confirm the election’s results. Neither the university nor federal investigators would comment to the paper.

Florida: The Indian River County commission has unanimously approved the $1 million purchase of new voting equipment. The new equipment from ES&S is expected to be in place and ready for use for the November 7 municipal elections. The county’s current system is 15 years old and at the end of its life.

 


 VII. VIP Update

Voting Information Project seeks new home
Market analysis will help gauge interest, identify appropriate options

Last September, the Voting Information Project (VIP)announced that it was beginning a process to identify its next phase, as The Pew Charitable Trusts transitions away from elections work.

As part of that effort, VIP identified a group of stakeholders from the elections, civic tech and data, and academic communities that has been discussing how best to continue the project’s success in partnering with election officials, businesses, and organizations to deliver vital information to voters across the nation.

In January, the group sought feedback from the field and was impressed by the depth and breadth of the enthusiasm for VIP and its continued work on behalf of voters.

Today, we wanted to share an update on where the project stands and what happens next:

  • The stakeholders’ group is finalizing a set of principles that will lay out the future vision for the Voting Information Project, including the work to be done and the desired characteristics of a new home for the project.

  • Those principles will be shared with the field, including on this blog, as part of a formal invitation for parties to indicate their interest in acting as the next home for VIP.

  • Based on those responses, Pew expects to identify and transition to that new home in time for the 2018 elections.

In preparation, Pew is working to identify the value of VIP to the field, both historically and going forward, by conducting a market analysis for the project’s continued operation. A Request for Information seeking firms that can conduct that analysis is available here. We will keep posting updates as the selection process for VIP’s new home moves ahead.  

This process has us excited about what’s next for the Voting Information Project, and we can’t wait to hear from those of you who are interested in continuing the mission of serving America’s voters.

Alexis Schuler is the senior director for state campaigns at The Pew Charitable Trusts.

 


 VIII. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Cybersecurity | Voting rights, II, III | Voter confidence | Student voters | SCOTUS nominee | Election integrity

Alabama: Voter fraud

California: Young voters

Colorado: Senate Bill 71 | Early voting | Wait times

Connecticut: Early voting

Florida: Secretary of state | Election schedule | Vote-by-mail | Ex-felon voting rights

Guam: Primary costs

Illinois: Voter fraud

Iowa: Election integrity bill, II, III | Voting rights

Louisiana: Ex-felon voting rights

Montana: Special election, II

Nebraska: Voter ID

New Hampshire: Weather | Election reform | Lessons from 2016 | Voter ID | Empowering voters

North Carolina: Same day registration

Ohio: Lucas County

Oregon: Pre-paid postage

Pennsylvania: Lessons learned

Texas: Voting rights, II | Voter ID

Utah: Turnout, II, III

Wisconsin: Voter ID | Voter education

 


IX. Upcoming Events

The Changing Trends in Elections — a special workshop from the Election Center where you will hear from colleagues and stakeholders in the election process covering issues such as the Electoral College debate, voter registration and litigation update, modernization of the voter registration process, media review of the 2016 election and polls and media projections impact on election administrators, changes and trends with vote-by-mail and other USPS issues, the 2015 American Community Survey, polling place accessibility and much more. Where: Columbus, Ohio. When: April 26-28.

The Future of Elections: Technology Policy and Funding — Join legislators, legislative staff, elections officials and election administration experts for a discussion on the future of elections technology and how to pay for it. Share ideas on updating voting infrastructure in an era of limited resources and heightened security concerns. In addition to a robust discussion on elections policy, attendees will enjoy all Colonial Williamsburg has to offer. Bring the whole family with you!When: June 14-16. Where: Williamsburg, Virginia.

IaoGO 2017 Annual Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the International Association of Government Officials 2017 Annual Conference. When: July 6-13, 2017. Where: Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin.

NASS 2017 Summer Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of Secretaries of State 2017 Summer Conference. When: July 7-10, 2017. Where: Indianapolis, Indiana.

NASED 2017 Summer Meeting— Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of State Election Directors 2017 Summer Meeting. When: August 22-25, 2017. Where: Anaheim, California.

 


 X. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Account Manager, Clear Ballot, Boston — we are looking for a talented Account Manager to play an active role in developing and maintaining long-term working relationships with Clear Ballot’s customers. This person should be able to work independently and in partnership with other team members to achieve high customer satisfaction. The account manager will have a regional assignment, with certain customers assigned to him/her. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and dedicated Customer Relations Manager to join our team! This is remote position that can be based in either Ohio or Pennsylvania. In this role, you will be responsible for providing world-class customer service to our customers in Ohio and Pennsylvania in order to achieve our core purpose of delivering solutions for the advancement of fair, accessible, and secure elections! You will problem solve, collaborate, create and improve processes, and make our customers successful in the execution of seemingly impossible tasks. Excitement lives here! Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Service Consultant, Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is seeking a Customer Service Consultant who has a strong desire to provide an outstanding customer experience for a growing company. Our Customer Service Consultant supports our customers on a daily basis by providing the following: Foster and develop positive customer relations by providing courteous, prompt and proactive customer service. Communicate with customers by phone, email or other correspondence. Respond to customer requests in a timely manner. Ensure timely Order Fulfillment through interactions with customers, other internal departments, and vendors: Create price quotations, orders, and similar requests for customers. Process purchase orders and enter purchase information into Order Management System. Verify all purchase orders and order information for accuracy. Contact customers to verify the information on purchase orders as it may be appropriate. Provide customers with assistance and information on part numbers, order status, troubleshooting their purchase orders, or other requests. Act as a liaison and coordinate with other departments through order completion and to expedite or resolve any issues or concerns. Provide follow up and respond to customer issues, inquiries, emails, correspondence, or other requests. Assist in maintaining up to date customer files. Partner with other departments to prepare documentation to process returns and credit memos. Partner with other departments to process requests for internal orders, including capital expenditure requests. Maintain a current working knowledge of product lines, prices, lead-time, and other relevant information. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Maricopa County, Arizona — administers comprehensive elections programs for Maricopa County.  Coordinates the timely electronic, mechanical, and/or by-hand count processing, verification and reporting of elections results in cooperation with other county, state and federal agencies.  Supervises the recruitment, training, and evaluation of election workers and staff.  Develops, administers and coordinates election division budgets.  Manages vendor relationships, procurement processes, and the Elections Department warehouse.   Reviews existing and proposed changes to election law, rules and regulations and oversees the implementation of changes to Election Department processes.  Provides feedback on proposed changes in law effecting the Elections Department.  Maintains security, auditing and accountability of all election materials and equipment, and related support resources.  Establishes policies and procedures to ensure the effective and efficient operation of the Elections Department.  Participates in the development of new and improved concepts and procedures for the most effective use of IT equipment, techniques, and best practices to improve efficiency of Elections Department functions.  Analyzes and develops recommendations for needed revisions, adjustments or creation of voting precincts.  Collects, analyzes and reports statistical election data to the County Recorder; and in conjunction with the County Recorder, to county, state and federal agencies and press.  Acts, as directed, as a spokesperson for the Elections Department in addition to interfacing with public, as needed. Salary: $97,281-$157,123. Deadline: April 30. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack .Net Developer, Dominion Voting Systems, Toronto, Ontario — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a highly technical and passionate Full Stack .Net Developer to join our team in downtown Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to design development, coding, testing and debugging of new voting system software and/or significant enhancements to existing software. This position will work on a team utilizing an Agile development environment. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS (Mapping) Specialist, Fort Meyers, Florida — Lee County Supervisor of Elections is seeking a full-time Geographical Information Specialist to maintain our county precinct map.  Using MapInfo in conjunction with our voter registration (Voter Focus).  Successful applicant will help diagnosis system problems, correct or initiate corrective action through other technicians, consultants, vendors, technical manuals or supervisors. Qualifications: Five years minimum of Map Info project management, software development and applications support experience and three years or more of experience with Voter Focus or a comparable voter registration system; or any equivalent combination of education, training, and experience which provides the requisite knowledge, skills, and abilities for this job. Salary: $45,000-$70,000. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Specialist, Denver, Colorado — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a tech-savvy, passionate Product Specialist to join our team in downtown Denver! This position will be responsible for providing technical support on all Dominion Voting Systems products both on-site, via the telephone or via email; write detailed, technical documentation for distribution internally and externally; and interface directly with customers, co-workers, and election officials. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Southeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Southeastern United States; preferably in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, or Louisiana. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Northeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Northeastern United States; preferably Illinois, Ohio or New York. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (West), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Western United States; preferably California. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales EngineerDominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and technically skilled Sales Engineer to be based in either California or Colorado. This position will be responsible for serving Dominion Voting Systems customers by identifying their needs; working with Engineering & Certification on adaptations of existing DVS products, equipment, and services; and this using technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying our products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Senior Software Engineer to be responsible for building and enhancing enterprise level web applications using JavaScript to create rich, dynamic and visually appealing experiences.  You should have expert knowledge of python, JavaScript and MySQL, as well as experience with various operating systems (Windows 10, Linux Ubuntu). The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills utilizing the latest concepts in front-end development, including responsive techniques, accessibility and client-side frameworks. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build a platform that is changing the elections industry. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Technical Trainer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — our small and growing documentation and training team has an immediate need for a new member with intermediate-to-senior experience in: Instructional design, development of learning curricula, production of training materials, and hands-on, customer facing training. Generally, the training department, technical staff, and operations staff provide training at the customer’s site. We need an instructional designer and trainer who can analyze the learners and materials, and establish an appropriately targeted learning program. The opportunity exists to develop computer based training as an enhancement to our learning curriculum. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — we are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 


 XI. Marketplace
electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


 XII. Electionline Underwriting

For 15 years, electionline.org has brought you all the election administration reform news and information of the day through electionlineToday and of the week through our weekly newsletter electionlineWeekly.

                       

Because of the generosity of such organizations as The Pew Charitable Trusts, Democracy Fund and the Hewlett Foundation we were able to bring you that news and information for free and free of advertising.

In order to continue providing you with the important news of the day and week we are now offering monthly underwriting for our daily and weekly postings (think more NPR, less local radio and television).

Underwriting will be available for electionlineToday, the weekly email that reaches about 4,800 inboxes each week and the weekly newsletter. Underwriting is available on a per-month basis and costs $2,500 per section per month. The underwriting is available on a first come, first-served basis. Each section will be exclusive to one underwriter per month.

We will accept underwriting from a variety of entities in the elections world, but will not accept political advertising.

Job posting and marketplace listings from elections offices seeking to sell/trade voting equipment will remain free of charge.

Reservations are now available. If you are interested in underwriting a section of election for a month (or more), please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.