I. In Focus This Week

Exit Interview: Ross Hein
Persistence, passion and mom lead to an unexpected career path

By This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

When your mom tells you to do something, you do it.

That’s why back in 2005, when Ross Hein was a recent college graduate and looking for a job, but also contemplating law school, and his mother saw a job posting for elections specialist, he applied to the Wisconsin Elections Board.

“I had no prior elections experience and there was an incredibly steep learning curve,” explained Hein who ultimately decided against law school and ended up working for the state for almost 12-years.

HeinHein, who has now stepped down from his position with the Wisconsin Election Commission (nee Government Accountability Board nee Wisconsin Elections Board) went from elections specialist to head of IT in 2011 and helped oversee some of the biggest changes to Wisconsin elections, like the implementation of HAVA and all of its many requirements including a new statewide voter registration database and polling place accessibility.

While he leaves as a fully-seasoned elections official, Hein admits those early days were a bit rough.

“When I initially started in elections the most challenging part was learning all of the various election specifics.  All of the rules and exceptions to absentee voting, registration, voting equipment certification, provisional voting, etc. were overwhelming to me,” Hein said. “After about six months, it felt a bit more tolerable, but still challenging as election rules, as you know, never stay the same.”

Hein said he was frequently discouraged but loved to feel like the work he was doing was making a positive influence and he did love the challenge and the learning process.

Although Hein may have felt a bit overwhelmed, his superiors were more than pleased with his work.

Hein was put in charge of two key HAVA programs involving voting equipment. He was responsible for the distribution of HAVA 102 funds for the handful of municipalities transitioning from lever machines. And he was responsible for implementing the HAVA provision requiring every polling place to have an accessible voting system. 

“Ross brought us credibility with the disability community and he blew away our county and municipal clerks with his candor, knowledge and support during a very difficult transition,” said Kevin Kennedy, former director of the Wisconsin Government Accountability Board.

Kennedy recalls meeting with the U.S. Department of Justice in early 2006 who wanted to know what the state’s plans were for ensuring accessible voting equipment was in every polling place.

“I was so confident in the preparations Ross and his co-workers had laid out that I never blinked,” Kennedy said. “I guaranteed the DOJ folks we would make the deadline - which we did. Only one municipality, which dithered too long in placing its order, was without accessible voting equipment at our partisan primary election.”

Hein ActionWorking in elections means doing a bit of everything, including helping keep things calm at meetings, which Hein (right) helped do in December 2016.

In 2011, after successfully overseeing Wisconsin’s first statewide recount since 1989, Hein was promoted to elections supervisor, which mean overseeing the IT deparment.

“Kevin was comfortable and knew my management style and I was looking for an opportunity to expand my portfolio so learning IT made me excited for the possibilities,” Hein said about his promotion. “I think with any managerial position, it is always about the people that you work with and bringing them together so they understand their roles and see and ideally buy into the vision is the approach that I have always taken.”

Kennedy said he was confident Hein could handle the challenge and he needed someone he could trust.

“As with the voting equipment and recount challenges, Ross embraced the opportunity. Elections in Wisconsin have vaulted ahead with a quantum leap as a result of his work,” Kennedy said. “Ross leaves a lasting impression of commitment, confidence and achievement with his co-workers, our LEOS and a rich legacy that will continue to serve the voters of Wisconsin for a very long time.”

Hein pointed out that while doing IT was different than his previous position, the underlying goals to be successful were the same.

“Most election mangers/directors are really a form on an IT manager, they probably just don't know it,” Hein said. “I think that some may just be a bit intimidated with the title of IT and don't realize that the expertise they have related to voter registration systems, OVR, voting equipment etc. is a form of IT management and I really hope that more will take the leap in considering themselves IT experts- because they really are.”

Moving forward, Hein said he would like to see elections officials further employing technology to make voting easier.

“There is no silver bullet and I understand the reasons for tapping the brakes, slowing the progress for utilizing technology to make voting easier. But it's going to happen-things like electronic ballot return, it is just waiting for the window of opportunity,” Hein said. “I'm always on the side of pushing technology while finding the appropriate security balance. I just want our voters to be able to have the tools to be able to vote in a convenient, easy way, while finding ways to ensure confidence with enhancing security measures. Getting there of course is the challenge!”

Although this is a constant challenge, Hein said he would like “Joe Voter” to know what election officials are doing to protect and maintain voter data from malicious purposes.

“It was always very frustrating to see so much misinformation out there that jeopardizes voter confidence and being an election official attempting to continuously combat that was tiresome,” Hein said. “It would be awesome if election officials wouldn't have to spend countless hours combating misinformation but I acknowledge that I am somewhat of a dreamer.”

Like so many elections officials, Hein said the best part about working in elections was the variety of people that he came in contact with, not only at the office, but out in the counties and towns. And that’s what he’ll miss the most too.

“I will miss all my amazing, dedicated election colleagues. Never have I felt more part of a team and the way an election official makes you feel welcomed is a special thing,” Hein said.

Hein has joined the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development as section chief in their IT bureau.

“I thought I was going to be a lifer in the election field and leaving election administration was one of the hardest decisions I've ever made and I miss it already so much,” Hein said. “Elections will always be in my blood and maybe someday I'll be back should the stars align once again.”

If the stars align, or if Hein’s mom tells him to apply for a job again.

 


 II. Election News This Week

The Hall County, Georgia board of elections and voter registration voted 2 to 1 to approve making bilingual election materials available for all elections moving forward. Although Hall County did not come under a Sec. 203 designation, elections board member Kim Copeland told The Gainesville Times that since nearby Gwinnett County had recently been required to offer the materials in Spanish, it was only a matter of time before Hall was too. “Hopefully we can save the taxpayers money from unnecessary lawsuits,” Copeland said.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson is doubling the time a voter is inactive before they are removed from the rolls. Previously, a voter would be removed from the rolls if they didn’t vote for five years. Richardson has extended that to 10 years. "This change will protect or restore the voting rights of Oregonians serving our country on military deployments, college students and voters frustrated with the political system," said Richardson. According to the Statesman Journal, Richardson says it doesn't make sense to be adding thousands of new voters through Motor Voter every year, while simultaneously purging thousands from that same active-voter list because they didn't cast a ballot for five years.

We may be in full spring bloom (at least in the warmer climes), but officials in New Hampshire are still dealing with a blizzard—or at least the effects of canceling several elections during a mid-March blizzard. Under the latest proposal, House Bill 329 would allow local elected officials to decide whether elections held other than on election day are legal. Interestingly, an analysis by the Union Leader found that turnout for elections held on the scheduled election day were higher, even with a blizzard raging, than on the rescheduled election days.

New Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes is hoping to shake things up in Arizona’s largest county and one of those plans under consideration is to move to all vote-by-mail elections in 2018. Fontes has estimated the cost will save the county about $30 over the next several years. "The old system, (it) is time, in my mind, to move to the side," Fontes, told The Republic. "I don't know anybody that uses a horse and buggy today either." Currently about 80 percent of Maricopa voters are already voting by mail.

In "sad" news, no one in Santa Fe, New Mexico who votes in a special election will be free tacos. A political committee supporting a tax under consideration in the special election had been promoting free tacos for the first 100 “I Voted” stickers. The group cancelled the event after members of the media began to inquire about the legality of offering free tacos. Voters will have to celebrate Taco Tuesday another way.

Personnel News: Sally Garvens of Richfield, Wisconsin has served her last election as a poll worker after 38 years. Lisa Grey has stepped down from the Staten Island, New York board of elections. Michelle Baldwin has formally been appointed registrar of voters in Tulare County, California. Former West Virginia Secretary of State Natalie Tennant has joined The Brennan Center for Justice as the manager of state advocacy. Karen Leader has resigned as the Nodaway County, Missouri clerk. Nancy Heck is retiring as a Hawkins County, Tennessee election commissioner. She is being replaced by Nancy Point. Boone County, Illinois Clerk and Recorder Mary Steurer is retiring after 40 years on the job. Reynaldo “Rey” Valenzuela, a 26-year veteran of the Maricopa County, Arizona elections department has been appointed permanent director of the department.

 


 III. Legislative Updates

Arizona: The Senate has approved House Bill 2244 that imposes a “strict compliance” legal standard on measures that citizen groups want to bring to the ballot.

Arkansas: Gov. Asa Hutchinson has signed legislation that bars Arkansas residents from simultaneously serving as a member of the state Board of Election Commissioners and a county election commission.

California: Senate Bill 568 would move the state’s 2020 primary election from June to the third Tuesday in March. The legislation is supported by Secretary of State Alex Padilla.

Colorado: Gov. John Hickenlooper has signed a bill into law that will ban “free speech zones” on college campuses meaning that students are free to express their ideas — including conducting voter registration drives — in public areas of campus.

Georgia: Under House Bill 268, voters could still cast a ballot in an election as long as they registered in time within the 26-month period, even if they were flagged by the system. They would need to provide ID information to correct the discrepancy at the polls before voting, or they could cast a provisional ballot.

Indiana: House Bill 1178 is headed to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s desk. While originally a bill that would automatically register Hoosiers to vote, the amended bill now requires Bureau of Motor Vehicles employees to ask each person conducting business at the local branch if they want to register to vote. If the answer is yes, the employee must provide the proper forms to register, then provide additional information on how to file the paperwork with the county voter registration office.

Iowa: The House has modified Secretary of State Paul Pate’s election integrity bill. Amendments include changing the implementation date for the absentee ballot provision to Jan. 1, 2018. It also would postpone until Jan. 1, 2019, a provision that would allow 17-year-olds to vote in primaries if they will be 18 by Election Day. The bill now heads back to the Senate.

By a 36-13 vote, the Senate has approved a bill requiring city and school elections to be held on the same day. The elections will be held after the first Monday in November during odd-number years. The bill now heads to Gov. Terry Branstad’s desk.

Kentucky: Clerks statewide are cheering a bill that, if signed by Gov. Matt Bevins (R) would allow local option elections to be held simultaneously with primary and general elections. Most local options elections decide whether or not to allow alcohol sales in an area. The bill also allows those who can’t vote in person on Election Day because of age, disability or illness, to cast an in-person absentee ballot at the county clerk’s office prior to an election.

Montana: Gov. Steve Bullock used his veto power to resurrect the possibility of an all-mail special election on May 25. According to KRTV, Bullock issued an amendatory veto to insert the mail-ballot option into another bill that is now going back to lawmakers for consideration. Under this procedure, the bill can be approved by a simple majority of the House and Senate. The Montana Association of Clerks and Recorders and Election Administrators has sent a letter to House Speaker Austin Knudsen seeking to have the bill brought to the House floor.

In non-special election news, a House committee has approved a bill that would create a ballot initiative that would prohibit the collection of a voter’s ballot to take it to a polling place, election office or the post office. The bill provides exceptions for family members, caregivers and acquaintances who are authorized to pick up ballots.

Nebraska: Senators vote 28-8 to eliminate the state’s two-year waiting period for ex-felons to have their voting rights restored.

New Hampshire: Legislation to allow for a pilot program of e-poll books in New Hampshire has been approved by the Senate and is currently awaiting a vote in the House. Proponents hope it will help eliminate lines at polling places, but those with concerns about the program—including Secretary of State William Gardner—have cited cybersecurity and back systems as their major concern.

New Mexico: Gov. Susana Martinez used a pocket veto to kill a bill that would have consolidated most local elections into one beginning in 2019. According to New Mexico Politics, The pocket veto was a defense of local laws requiring photo identification to vote, Martinez spokesman Chris Sanchez said. “It would have taken away voter ID in the local jurisdictions that have implemented it,” Sanchez said. “The governor is a strong supporter of voter ID.”

North Carolina: Under legislation introduced by Rep. Carl Ford (R-76) how members of boards of elections in Davie, Rowan and Stanly counties are appointed would change. If it becomes law, the measure — House Bill 508 — would tie the majority on the three boards of elections to the majority on each county’s board of commissioners.

Also in North Carolina, the Senate voted not to go along with a House bill that would merge the ethics and elections commissions. Instead, the bill was sent to a conference committee of Senate and House members to work out a compromise. Gov. Roy Cooper said last week he would veto the bill because it curtails voting rights. It also deprives the governor of the power to control the boards through appointments.

Pennsylvania: Rep. Chris Rabb (D-Philadelphia) said he plans to introduce legislation that would establish early voting 15 days before an election as well as allowing for no-excuse absentee voting.

Texas: Lawmakers are considering Senate Bill 148 which would repeal a section of the state’s election code that requires interpreters to be registered voters in the same county in which they are providing help.

Washington: Senate Bill 5472 is on its way to the governor’s desk. If signed into law, the legislation would add about 250 to 275 ballot dropboxes statewide. It requires at least one ballot dropbox for every 15,000 registered voters.

 


 IV. Legal Updates

Kansas: U.S. Magistrate James O’Hara has ruled that a document Secretary of State Kris Kobach was seen carrying into a meeting with the president could be relevant to the federal lawsuit against the state’s proof-of-citizenship law. O’Hara has ordered Kobach to produce the document as well a second internal office document.

Montana: In other Montana special election news, U.S. District Judge Brian Morris ordered Montana Secretary of State Corey Stapleton to reduce the number of voter’s signatures needed to place a minor party and independent candidates on the May 25 special election ballot from 14,268 to 400. That being said, the judge did not extend the March 6 deadline and therefore the three candidates who sued for ballot access will still not gain access to the ballot.

North Carolina: Joy Yvette Wilkerson, 41, of Henderson is facing multiple counts of fraudulently altering voter registrations to restore voting privileges to 250 ineligible felons. Wilkerson was a temporary elections worker at the time.

Pennsylvania: They aren’t often on the same side, but last week, Pennsylvania’s Republican and Green parties both sued to void a Philadelphia special election. They accused Democrats of intimidating voters. According to Courthouse News Services, the 29-page complaint says that election board workers “virtually all of whom are registered Democrats” were directing voters at the polls to cast their vote for the Democratic write-in candidate.

Texas: U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos has ruled — again — that the 2011 Texas voter ID law is in violation of the Voting Rights Act. Ramos said that the civil rights that sued the state had provided evidence establishing that discrimination was “at least one of the substantial or motivating factors behind passage” of the law by the GOP-controlled Legislature in 2011.

In other legal news, Laura Pressley, who lost a 2014 race for Austin City council has appealed to the state Supreme Court. In the 432-page filing, Pressley reiterates her contention that the Travis County clerk’s office broke the law by not securing “ballot images” from its electronic voting machines.

Virginia: The Virginia Attorney General’s office has declined to issue a legal opinion on whether it’s a conflict for a Botetourt County elected official to share office space with the voting machines scheduled to be used in the next election.

 


 V. Tech Thursday

National: The Pew Charitable Trusts has released a new interactive tool that tracks state and local adoption of the use of e-poll books and summarizes survey findings on e-poll book use across the nation. Pew collected and compared information on five topics related to e-poll books: Whether a state required legislation to adopt EPBs; Who developed the necessary software and hardware; The functions and features that each state’s EPB offers; Whether EPBs within a state are linked locally or via the internet; and What voter information is collected and stored.

Georgia: Federal authorities have determined that no federal laws were broken in the breach of the Kennesaw State University’s Center for Election Systems. A “security researcher” was responsible for the breach, but no charges have been announced.

Iowa: In partnership with all 99 counties, Secretary of State Paul Pate will distribute tablet computers, equipped with the American with Disabilities (ADA) Checklist Program app, to every auditor’s office. The technology provided by the app will allow counties to more easily identify accessible polling locations in all 1,681 precincts across the state. Features of the app include the ability to take photos of polling place structures and providing guidance for making temporary accommodations. Additionally, it helps with polling place layout, reports and tracking supply needs for individual polling places.

 


 VI. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election integrity | Voter ID | Web-based voting | Cyber security | Electronic voting | Voter data | Number of elections

Hawaii: Vote-by-mail

Illinois: Ballot selfies | Bilingual election judge | Automatic voter registration

Iowa: Election integrity bill, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII | Ranked choice voting

Kansas: Voting machines

Maine: Ranked choice voting, II;

Maryland: Talbot County

Massachusetts: Non-citizen voting

Minnesota: Same day registration | Voter fraud | Election equipment

Missouri: Ranked choice voting

Montana: Special election, II

Nebraska: Voter ID | Modern elections

Nevada: Voting rights

New Mexico: Vote-buying

North Carolina: Election legislation, II | Student voting rights

Ohio: Online voter registration

Oregon: Secretary of state

Texas: Voter Education | Voter fraud | Harrison County | Voter ID, II, III | Federal supervision

 


 VII. Upcoming Events

The Changing Trends in Elections — a special workshop from the Election Center where you will hear from colleagues and stakeholders in the election process covering issues such as the Electoral College debate, voter registration and litigation update, modernization of the voter registration process, media review of the 2016 election and polls and media projections impact on election administrators, changes and trends with vote-by-mail and other USPS issues, the 2015 American Community Survey, polling place accessibility and much more. Where: Columbus, Ohio. When: April 26-28.

The Future of Elections: Technology Policy and Funding — Join legislators, legislative staff, elections officials and election administration experts for a discussion on the future of elections technology and how to pay for it. Share ideas on updating voting infrastructure in an era of limited resources and heightened security concerns. In addition to a robust discussion on elections policy, attendees will enjoy all Colonial Williamsburg has to offer. Bring the whole family with you! When: June 14-16. Where: Williamsburg, Virginia.

IaoGO 2017 Annual Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the International Association of Government Officials 2017 Annual Conference. When: July 6-13, 2017. Where: Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin.

NASS 2017 Summer Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of Secretaries of State 2017 Summer Conference. When: July 7-10, 2017. Where: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Summer Conference on Election Science, Reform and Administration — Hosted by Reed College and Portland State University the goals of the conference are, first, to provide a forum for scholars in political science, public administration, law, computer science, statistics, and other fields who are working to develop rigorous empirical approaches to the study of how laws and administrative procedures affect the quality of elections in the United States; and, second, to build scientific capacity by identifying major questions in the field, fostering collaboration, and connecting senior and junior scholars. When: July 26-27. Where: Portland, Oregon.

NASED 2017 Summer Meeting— Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of State Election Directors 2017 Summer Meeting. When: August 22-25, 2017. Where: Anaheim, California.

 


 VIII. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Account Manager, Clear Ballot, Boston — we are looking for a talented Account Manager to play an active role in developing and maintaining long-term working relationships with Clear Ballot’s customers. This person should be able to work independently and in partnership with other team members to achieve high customer satisfaction. The account manager will have a regional assignment, with certain customers assigned to him/her. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and dedicated Customer Relations Manager to join our team! This is remote position that can be based in either Ohio or Pennsylvania. In this role, you will be responsible for providing world-class customer service to our customers in Ohio and Pennsylvania in order to achieve our core purpose of delivering solutions for the advancement of fair, accessible, and secure elections! You will problem solve, collaborate, create and improve processes, and make our customers successful in the execution of seemingly impossible tasks. Excitement lives here! Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Nonprofit Vote — Nonprofit VOTE partners with America’s nonprofits to help the people they serve – communities typically left out of the political process – participate and vote. We are the largest source of nonpartisan resources to help nonprofits integrate voter engagement into their ongoing activities and services. Nonprofit VOTE also assists nonprofits with other forms of civic engagement, and increasingly Census participation. Nonprofit VOTE manages the multi-organizational work of National Voter Registration Day (NVRD). NVRD is a single day of coordinated field, technology, and media efforts, held on the fourth Tuesday in September, to raise awareness of voter registration opportunities and ultimately help hundreds of thousands of Americans get registered to vote. Director of Strategic Partnerships will be focused on cultivating partnerships and related activities for both Nonprofit VOTE and NVRD. The Dir. of Strategic Partnerships will be based in a shared space or home office easily accessible to Washington, DC, with frequent travel across the country and to Nonprofit VOTE’s main office in Boston. Deadline: May 14. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Warehouse Technician, Yavapai County, Arizona — Under minimal supervision, coordinates all the logistical activities for obtaining and equipping the county's polling locations.  This includes assuring that these sites are in compliance with the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) and Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). PLEASE NOTE:  This is not a typical warehouse job; no hard hats or heavy equipment operator licenses are necessary.  Ideal candidate would have experience in election equipment testing and maintenance, leading a group of seasonal staff, project planning and preparing documents.  Preference will be given to candidates with supervisory, project management and Microsoft Office experience. Employment with Yavapai County Government is contingent upon successfully passing a criminal background check and verification of work history, academic credentials, licenses and certifications, as applicable. Salary: $35,731-$41,073. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack .Net Developer, Dominion Voting Systems, Toronto, Ontario — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a highly technical and passionate Full Stack .Net Developer to join our team in downtown Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to design development, coding, testing and debugging of new voting system software and/or significant enhancements to existing software. This position will work on a team utilizing an Agile development environment. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Specialist, Denver, Colorado — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a tech-savvy, passionate Product Specialist to join our team in downtown Denver! This position will be responsible for providing technical support on all Dominion Voting Systems products both on-site, via the telephone or via email; write detailed, technical documentation for distribution internally and externally; and interface directly with customers, co-workers, and election officials. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Southeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Southeastern United States; preferably in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, or Louisiana. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Northeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Northeastern United States; preferably Illinois, Ohio or New York. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (West), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Western United States; preferably California. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and technically skilled Sales Engineer to be based in either California or Colorado. This position will be responsible for serving Dominion Voting Systems customers by identifying their needs; working with Engineering & Certification on adaptations of existing DVS products, equipment, and services; and this using technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying our products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Senior Software Engineer to be responsible for building and enhancing enterprise level web applications using JavaScript to create rich, dynamic and visually appealing experiences.  You should have expert knowledge of python, JavaScript and MySQL, as well as experience with various operating systems (Windows 10, Linux Ubuntu). The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills utilizing the latest concepts in front-end development, including responsive techniques, accessibility and client-side frameworks. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build a platform that is changing the elections industry. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Technical Trainer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — our small and growing documentation and training team has an immediate need for a new member with intermediate-to-senior experience in: Instructional design, development of learning curricula, production of training materials, and hands-on, customer facing training. Generally, the training department, technical staff, and operations staff provide training at the customer’s site. We need an instructional designer and trainer who can analyze the learners and materials, and establish an appropriately targeted learning program. The opportunity exists to develop computer based training as an enhancement to our learning curriculum. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — we are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 


 IX. Marketplace
electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Diebold TS-RG Voting Machines
The Maryland State Board of Elections is currently auctioning off its legacy Diebold TS-RG voting machines via the GovDeals.com website. The link to the auction is here and the auction closes at various times on May 3, 2017.

 


 X. Electionline Underwriting

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