I. In Focus This Week

Project Vote to close its doors on May 31
At critical time for voting rights, lack of funding leads to closure

By M. Mindy Moretti
Electionline.org

Project Vote, a national, nonpartisan, nonprofit that has spent recent years focusing its attention on improving voter registration, especially the enforcement of the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) will officially close its doors on May 31.

Michael Slater, president since 2003, cited the lack of funding as the reason for the closure.

“[F]unding for voter registration programs declined precipitously after 2008, and the number of funders supporting voting rights advocacy and litigation slowly decreased as well,” Slater said. “At the same time, more organizations created voting rights programs, which resulted in more competition.”

Slater also pointed to the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision to strike down the pre-clearance provisions of the Voting Rights Act which resulted in the donor community focusing available voting rights resources on VRA enforcement, which had the effect of reducing funds for other work, such as Project Vote’s work enforcing the NVRA.

“Despite that changing environment, we were able for many years to continue to deliver on our mission to make sure the American electorate better reflected the needs and diversity of the American people,” Slater said.

For a single-issue nonprofit like Project Vote — without a diverse portfolio of work to fundraise on — the situation gradually become untenable.

“A reorganization of the civic engagement infrastructure, and donor uncertainty over how best to respond to the 2016 election, finally proved to be too much for us, and we were forced to conclude that our current model was unsustainable in this environment,” Slater said.

Project Vote’s shuttering comes at a time when voting rights are making headlines daily and Slater is concerned about what impact the closure may have.

“From our perspective, voting rights work has never been more important. We hae been warning for months that [President Donald J.] Trump’s absurd rhetoric about ‘voter fraud’ signaled a top-down assault on the right to vote in America,” Slater said. “The concern, of course, is that the remaining voting rights organizations, already spread thing, will be unable to keep up with this assault.

The news of Project Vote’s closure is slowly starting to spread throughout the elections community and it is being met with sadness.

“We're terribly saddened by the closing of Project Vote. It has been a great organization that has contributed significantly to the protection of the fundamental right to vote,” said Ezra Rosenberg, co-director of the Voting Rights Project at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “Its role in ensuring the registration of all eligible voters was and remains of utmost importance.  It is particularly unfortunate for this to happen at a time when voting rights are under tremendous attack.”

Project Vote was involved in many legal cases nationwide with some recent cases including reaching a settlement agreement with Maricopa County, Arizona, settling a suit with Georgia on access to public records Maricopa County, Arizona aas wellas an onling list maintenance case with a summary judgment deadline tomorrow in, ACRU v Snipes, in Florida.

“This is very sad news for voters,” said Rick Hasen, chancellor’s professor of law and political science at UC Irvine and author of the ElectionLaw Blog. “Project Vote has been a leader in making sure that states comply with the provisions of the motor-voter law making it easier for people to register and vote when they come into contact with government agencies. I hope that others can step in and help with this very important work.”

Thomas Hicks, commissioner on the U.S. Election Assistance Commission pointed to the groups’ work in Nevada in 2016 that resulted in a Memorandum of Understanding to bring the state into compliance with NVRA.

“I am sad they are going away,” Hicks said. “They do a great deal in terms of voter registration and I don’t know if there are folks out there to fill that void. In my own opinion, it’s horrible that an organization that does as much as they do will no longer exist.”

John Lindback, who is currently executive director of ERIC, but used to serve an elections official in Oregon and Alaska said that as an elections official, Project Vote was never far from his mind.

“When I served as an elections official I was keenly aware that Project Vote was watching and monitoring any actions by states that might adversely affect voting rights,” Lindback said. “Project Vote served as a constant reminder to elections officials that it was important, for example, to comply with the NVRA. Such groups are vitally important to any Democracy, including the U.S.A.”

Project vote has helped millions of Americans get registered to vote through their direct engagement project and they’ve trained countless organizations to run efficient, effective voter drives.

“My thought is, online voter registration is great, but it’s just one additional tool to get people registered to vote and you need groups like Project Vote out there actually doing the footwork,” Hicks said.

With its extensive library of advocacy materials, the Project Vote website will remain live for at least the next three years.

Moving forward, staff will be taking some time off to spend with family and reflect, but most will be looking for employment. According to Slater, there is a good possibility that many staff and a large portion of Project Vote’s program portfolio will move to peer organizations.

As for the future of Project Vote, while Slater isn’t optimistic, all hope is not necessarily lost.

“It is hard to un-ring that bell. The board, however, will be meeting to discuss whether there is a role for a reconfigured Project Vote in the future,” Slater said. “After all, the Project Vote of today is version 3.0 of something that started in 1984. Who’s to say that a Project Vote 4.0 won’t make sense in one or two years?”

 


 II. Our Say

The impact of Project Vote
Douglas R. Hess, assistant professor of Political Science
Grinnell College

The impact of Project Vote’s work can be found in three areas, in each of which Project Vote’s staff, which at one time included a young Barack Obama, played highly influential roles. 

First, Project Vote directly and indirectly registered to vote millions of citizens. These were mostly low-income, women, minority, and new citizens. Indeed, the only direct voter registration efforts that came close to Project Vote’s record achievement in this area, were those of the Obama campaign. As voter registration drives grew, they came under increasing attack. Ironically, many election officials who were doing little to conduct or enforce mandated voter registration outreach under the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), engaged in some of these attacks.

Second, it generated and advocated for research and technical assistance on policy and procedural matters that would close the voter registration and participation gaps in American elections. Finally, Project Vote played a role in numerous influential lawsuits related to voter registration rights, registration drives, access to voter registration records, and the purging of lists.

Of course, policy advocacy and litigation is an activity that a great many civil rights organizations engage in. However, not having grown out of the “LDEFs” (legal defense and education funds) movement, I think Project Vote often had a different take on policy and litigation.

Unlike its peer organizations, Project Vote had direct experience in the physical process of voter registration—as one past executive director said, it had the bruises to prove this. Also unlike its peers, Project Vote put a significant amount of time and expertise into analytic studies.

To provide one example, the one I am most personally familiar with, Project Vote’s experience beyond the courtroom and lobbies, influenced how it designed remedies for violations of the NVRA. When some groups stressed remedies such as 800 numbers and radio broadcasts, Project Vote insisted on very detailed monitoring data. As a direct result of this administrative detail, some states have maintained significant NVRA-related registration efforts for years. In other states, the data allows advocates (and officials if they were so interested) to identify non-compliance with the NVRA.

A related example was the promotion of voter registration technology in public offices that were poorly thought through but which allowed advocates, officials, and funders to claim success. The lack of attention to the mundane technical details, however, meant that some of these reforms fell apart shortly after they were implemented. A lack of analytic approach to how complex government organizations evolve and how policy is administered guaranteed that these some of these victories were short lived. Sadly, Project Vote, and occasionally a few allies who also had an analytic bent, often seemed to be playing the role of Cassandra in some of these battles, condemned to know what would (or wouldn't) happen while lacking an audience that would listen.

Thus, I fear the disappearance, even if temporary, of Project Vote from the scene means that too much of the voting rights work will include courtroom battles and flashy policy changes that do not keep the eye on the prize: the registration gap and its connection to policy detail.


 III. Election News This Week

Beginning in 2018, Putnam County, Indiana hopes to join a growing list of counties in the Hoosier State that uses vote centers to conduct elections. According to the Banner Graphic, Clerk Heather Gilbert presented a proposal to the county commission to make the switch. “We’re asking to do this because we’re falling behind,” Gilbert said, pointing out that a number of surrounding counties have gone to the vote center model. According to the paper, Gilbert noted that the move going from 29 polling locations down to eight will cause a big change in the election day staff she needs, down to 56 workers from the 145 previously required. The county would also provide 267 fewer meals to workers on election day and save on rental costs of several of the locations.

This makes us so happy! After an almost 20-year absence, Northampton County, Pennsylvania will once again begin handing out “I Voted” stickers beginning with the November 2017 general election. According to the Morning Call, although no one is sure why the county stopped handing them out, they think it was for budgetary reasons. "People started asking me, 'Why don't we get them? Why is my friend running around with an "I Voted" sticker?'" explained Councilman Ken Kraft who lead the charge to bring back the stickers.

And in more good news, the Veteran of Foreign Wars (VFW) in Lauderdale County, Mississippi presented the county with 45,000 “I Voted” stickers. This will be the first time the county passes out the stickers. "The stickers are real important because we want to know that they can go out and be proud that they voted and wear it and maybe get more awareness to get more people to the polls. Without the voters we cant make a difference until the voters show up," Natalie Copeland, a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 12124 told WTOK.

Personnel News: Vida Terry was recently recognized by the Wisconsin Legislature for her years of elections service in the Town of Brighton. State Rep. Trevor Drown (R) has announced his candidacy for the Arkansas secretary of seat that will be open in 2018. Rick Wagner is the new Clallam County, Washington elections supervisor. Michael Boudreaux has been appointed registrar of voters for Lafourche Parish, Louisiana.

In Memoriam: Former Louisiana Secretary of State Al Ater has died of cancer. He was 63. Ater was most well-known for ensure that voters displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were able to participate in local elections after the storms. “Al was known as a guy who was always willing to negotiate and get the work of the people done in a non-partisan manner,” Secretary of State Tom Schedler said. “At the Secretary of State's Office he is remembered for his exemplary leadership after Hurricane Katrina in pulling off the New Orleans Mayoral Election under extraordinary conditions, making Louisiana the model for emergency preparedness for voting.” Ater served nine years in the Louisiana House first being elected at the age of 29. In 2001 he was named the first assistant to then-Secretary of State Fox McKeithen. Ater had only been on the job as interim secretary of state when Katrina hit in August 2005.

Betty Cook, member of the Mercer County, Ohio Board of Election died May 8. She was 87. Cook had been a member of the for 24-years and had served as chairman for a period of time. "She was very meticulous and detailed, and so often we would pass ballots and she would find that little missing thing," Toni Slusser told the Daily Standard. "(She was) a very classy lady. She brought a lot of professionalism to the board."

 


IV. Legislative Update

Federal Legislation: A bill has been reintroduced into the House which mandates that no voter should have to wait in line for more than hour to cast a ballot. The Voting Access Act establishes standards for staffing and placement of polling locations.

Alabama: The Legislature has approved a bill that would automatically restore the voting rights of “many” ex-felons. The bill more clearly defines the term “moral turpitude”. The legislation limits the term to less than 50 specific felonies.

Also in Alabama, a bill to prohibit people from voting in a political party’s runoff if they voted in the other party’s preceding primary has been approved by the Legislature and now awaits the governor’s signature.

Connecticut: The House voted 78 to 70 for a resolution authorizing a referendum on a constitutional amendment allowing early voting.

Michigan: The Senate has approved legislation that would double recount fees for a candidate who lost an election by more than 5 percentage points. Rates would go from $125 to $250 per precinct. It would not alter the rates for candidates who lost by fewer than 50 votes or 0.5 percentage points.

Minnesota: Secretary of State Steve Simon is supporting legislation that would create five uniform dates throughout the year when a special election for vacancies in local elections or for ballot questions would be allowed to be held.

Nevada: With the deadline for the legislative session looming, lawmakers approved a bill that will allow counties to establish vote centers open to all eligible residents regardless of their home’s proximity to the polling place.

New Hampshire: Lawmakers are considering a measure that proposes amending absentee ballot forms to say that the signature must match the signature on the affidavit envelope in which the ballot is returned.

New York: The Senate has approved legislation that would consolidate federal and state primary elections to the third Tuesday in August. The Assembly has approved a bill that would consolidate the elections to the fourth Tuesday in June.

Also in New York, the New York City council has approved legislation that will require the Campaign Finance Board to send registered voters a four-year voting record.

Texas: By a 95-54 vote following a six-hour debate, the House has approved Senate Bill 5 that would relax some of the rules governing Texas’ strict voter ID law. SB 5 would add options for voters who say they cannot “reasonably” obtain one of seven forms of required ID, and it would create criminal penalties — which House members reduced on Tuesday — for those who falsely claim they need to choose from the expanded list of options.

 


V.  Legal Update

National: The American Civil Liberties Union has sent Freedom of Information Act requests to Kansas, Indiana, Maine and New Hampshire. “We believe the outcome of the commission’s investigation is preordained,” said Dale Ho, director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project. “It’s time to shed light on whether any commission members were crafting policy recommendations before their investigation was launched or the commission was even formally announced. If they’ve got evidence, it’s time to stop hiding and start sharing.”

Florida: Clay County Circuit Judge Gary Wilkinson has upheld an election for Putnam County sheriff that was decided by only 16 votes. In his 21-page ruling, Wilkinson concluded that it reflected the will of the voters and that the challenger did not prove a number of controversial ballots were sufficient to sway, or cast doubts on the results.

Maine: The state’s highest court has ruled that ranked choice voting, approved by the voters in 2016 is unconstitutional. In a unanimous advisory opinion, the seven justices on the Maine Supreme Judicial Court acknowledged the validity of citizen-initiative ballot questions but noted that even citizen-enacted laws can be unconstitutional. “The object must always be to ‘ascertain the will of the people,'” the court wrote. “Nonetheless, when a statute – including one enacted by citizen initiative – conflicts with a constitutional provision, the constitution prevails.”

Ohio: According to Secretary of State Jon Husted, 22 people have been referred for prosecution for voting in both Ohio and another state in 2016. “We reviewed every reported case of voter suppression and voter fraud and are sharing those facts to inform the discussion on election integrity," Husted told The Toledo Blade. “Once again our review shows that while rare, voting fraud does occur. But more importantly, we are holding those accountable who violate our election laws,” Mr. Husted said.

South Carolina: Richland County, South Carolina has reached an agreement with Office of Civil Rights to bring 49 polling places into accordance with the American with Disabilities Act. The county has until June to make the sites accessible.

Texas: Attorney General Ken Paxton has issued a ruling that 262 men housed in treatment center for sexual offenses are allowed to cast ballots by mail. The men at the facility have completed their prison sentences, but are civilly committed to the facility. Paxton’s ruling means that under Texas law, they are permitted to cast their ballots. The ruling comes after about 100 ballots from offenders at the facility were tossed in November 2016.

Wisconsin: Attorney General Brad Schimel has filed an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking to have the court block a lower court ruling that would force state lawmakers to redraw legislative maps by November. “Wisconsin should not be required to invest the considerable time, effort and taxpayer resources required to redraw district maps, especially when the case is likely to be reversed,” Schimel said in a statement. 

 


 VI. Tech Thursday

National: Organizers of the 2017 DEFCON — the world’s largest hacking conference — have told Politico that they plan to have a village of different opportunities for some of the 25,000 hackers in attendance to test how easily voting machines can be manipulated. DEFCON founder Jeff Moss (also known as Dark Tangent) said he’s concerned that no one has proven where the soft spots are — and the combination of non-disclosure agreements and private contracts have allowed misinformation to take root. “Pretty much, just like everything else, it’s time for hackers to come in and tell you what’s possible and what’s not,” Moss told Politico.

Arizona: Fifteen years after Arizona launched online voter registration the state is set to build a new voter registration system. The state partnered with Gartner Consulting which took six months to conduct comprehensive interviews with local election officials and voter registration personnel. “We all see this as an exciting opportunity to further secure our registration data and make needed improvements to a cumbersome and outdated system,” said Secretary Reagan. “Once we receive the proposals, our counties will be able to determine which solution works best for them moving forward.”

Virginia: For a brief period of time on voter registration deadline day the state’s online voter registration system was displaying warning messages saying the state’s website was unsecure. According to the Richmond Times-Dispatch the issue lasted about an hour and was fixed shortly after officials were notified. Elections Commissioner Edgardo Cortes told the paper in an email that the change occurred during a “broader site security enhancement” that “should not have been implemented” Monday.

 


 VII. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Presidential commission, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII | Voting rights, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII | Latino voters | Voting changes | Election wars

Arizona: Mandatory voting

California: Voting system

Idaho: Voter suppression

Indiana: Turnout

Louisiana: Al Ater, II

Maine: Presidential commission | Ranked choice voting, II

Maryland: Early voting

Massachusetts: Lowell elections

Minnesota: Voting equipment | Making voting easier | Ranked choice voting

Nebraska: Election legislation

New Hampshire: Secure elections | Election reform

New York: Early voting, II | Election modernization, II, III | Voter suppression

North Carolina: Voter ID, II, III

Rhode Island: Election audits

Texas: Straight-ticket voting | Voter ID | Dallas County

 


 VIII. Upcoming Events

The Future of Elections: Technology Policy and Funding — Join legislators, legislative staff, elections officials and election administration experts for a discussion on the future of elections technology and how to pay for it. Share ideas on updating voting infrastructure in an era of limited resources and heightened security concerns. In addition to a robust discussion on elections policy, attendees will enjoy all Colonial Williamsburg has to offer. Bring the whole family with you! When: June 14-16. Where: Williamsburg, Virginia.

IaoGO 2017 Annual Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the International Association of Government Officials 2017 Annual Conference. When: July 6-13, 2017. Where: Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin.

NASS 2017 Summer Conference — Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of Secretaries of State 2017 Summer Conference. When: July 7-10, 2017. Where: Indianapolis, Indiana.

National Association of Election Officials Professional Education Program — Program includes Course I (Introduction to Election and Voter Registration Systems Administration); Course II (Management and Leadership Concepts in Election and Voter Registration Administration); Course III (Planning and Budgeting for Elections and Voter Registration); Course IV (Election and Voter Registration Information Management and Technology); Course V (Ethics in Elections and Voter Registration Administration). Where: Sanibel Harbour Hotel, Fort Meyers, Florida. When: July 8-15.

Summer Conference on Election Science, Reform and Administration — Hosted by Reed College and Portland State University the goals of the conference are, first, to provide a forum for scholars in political science, public administration, law, computer science, statistics, and other fields who are working to develop rigorous empirical approaches to the study of how laws and administrative procedures affect the quality of elections in the United States; and, second, to build scientific capacity by identifying major questions in the field, fostering collaboration, and connecting senior and junior scholars. When: July 26-27. Where: Portland, Oregon.

National Association of Election Officials 33rd Annual Conference —This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we share trending elections and voter registration issues including The 2016 Elections in Review, Technology Advances in Voter Registration and Elections and Polling Place Line Management, to name a few, Also, crucial information from federal agencies to local election officials sharing practical information for day to day election administration operations. This is the also the time to honor and celebrate the winners of the Election Center’s acclaimed Professional Practices Papers’ Program. You will hear the winning presentations and you will take home all of the innovative programs and ideas that were submitted by your colleagues in other jurisdictions around the country. When: August 19-23. Where: Orange County, California.

NASED 2017 Summer Meeting— Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more information and registration details on the National Association of State Election Directors 2017 Summer Meeting. When: August 22-25, 2017. Where: Anaheim, California.

 


IX. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Associate Components Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston — our growing team has an immediate need in our Boston office for an entry-level/early career Associate Components Engineer in our Product Management organization. As an Associate Components Engineer, you will be at the center of maintaining Clear Ballot as the leader of commercial-off-the-shelf based voting systems.  The list of materials in our voting systems is broad and dynamic; and you will be accountable for staying ahead of vendor product roadmaps, leading the identification and evaluation of new technologies and products from those vendors, identifying new sources of components, then managing new models and products through introduction, test, internal training and deployment.  You may also perform manufacturing engineering duties and vendor surveys.  The successful candidate will be managing finished goods and subassemblies such as computers, printers, and scanners- not board level components. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Data Reporting Supervisor, Orange County, Florida — The Office of the Supervisor of Elections is seeking an experienced GIS Data Reporting Supervisor to join our dynamic team. With minimal supervision, this position maintains accurate street index, precinct map, municipal and district boundaries for the elections office. The position coordinates all activities related to management of census data and redistricting. The ideal candidate would have experience managing GIS data for a government agency, developing and maintaining data reporting for internal and external parties and experience working with Oracle database, forms and reports including development of SQL queries and stored procedures. Preference will be given to candidates with strong supervisory skills, project management experience and prior experience utilizing MapInfo. Employment with the Orange County Supervisor of Elections Office is contingent upon successfully passing a criminal background check, health screening and verification of work history, academic credentials, licenses and certifications, as applicable. Salary: Grade 14-Minimum $56,998, Maximum $85,486. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Warehouse Technician, Yavapai County, Arizona — Under minimal supervision, coordinates all the logistical activities for obtaining and equipping the county's polling locations.  This includes assuring that these sites are in compliance with the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) and Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). PLEASE NOTE:  This is not a typical warehouse job; no hard hats or heavy equipment operator licenses are necessary.  Ideal candidate would have experience in election equipment testing and maintenance, leading a group of seasonal staff, project planning and preparing documents.  Preference will be given to candidates with supervisory, project management and Microsoft Office experience. Employment with Yavapai County Government is contingent upon successfully passing a criminal background check and verification of work history, academic credentials, licenses and certifications, as applicable. Salary: $35,731-$41,073. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Division Director, Ada County, Idaho — collaborates with the Clerk of the District and Chief Deputy to plan, oversee, and administer elections for over 200,000 registered voters across 145 precincts. The Elections Director is responsible for ensuring all of the necessary resources are acquired and in place, poll workers are well prepared, and that Ada County’s elections are conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner that leaves Ada County voters with the upmost confidence in the elections process. The Elections Director is expected to exercise independent judgment and discretion, under the general direction of the Clerk of the District Court & Chief Deputy, to manage the administration of all federal, state, county and local district elections. The Director is responsible for planning, designing, and carrying out programs, projects, studies or other work related to election administration within Ada County. Salary: $65,000-$75,000. Deadline: June 15, 2017. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack .Net Developer, Dominion Voting Systems, Toronto, Ontario — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a highly technical and passionate Full Stack .Net Developer to join our team in downtown Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to design development, coding, testing and debugging of new voting system software and/or significant enhancements to existing software. This position will work on a team utilizing an Agile development environment. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Specialist 4, Washington Secretary of State’s Office — this position is the Election Review Program lead within the Election Certification and Training program. The Election Certification and Training program oversees, directs, and advises county auditors in interpretations of federal and state election law and the correct administration of voter registration and elections throughout the state. The certification and training program reviews county practices for adherence to election law and best practices, provides essential tools for election administrators through official communications and training, and acts as liaisons for the Office of the Secretary of State. This position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration. Salary: $4,109-$5,385. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems  is seeking an experienced and passionate Project Manager to join our team in Michigan! This position will be responsible for the effective project management of assigned projects which includes, but not limited to, product implementations, scheduling, budgeting, quality control, staffing, communication, risk management, fulfillment, integration and customer communication. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Southeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Southeastern United States; preferably in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, or Louisiana. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (Northeast), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Northeastern United States; preferably Illinois, Ohio or New York. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager (West), Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking is highly-motivated and accomplished Regional Sales Manager to work remotely and be based in the Western United States; preferably California. The Regional Sales Manager is responsible for long term sales (3-5 years) of the company’s election products and services in a specified geographic region to governmental agencies. This position uses technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying the products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. In addition, the position provides input and participates in the marketing, planning and development of products and services. Salary: Negotiable base + commission & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a passionate and technically skilled Sales Engineer to be based in either California or Colorado. This position will be responsible for serving Dominion Voting Systems customers by identifying their needs; working with Engineering & Certification on adaptations of existing DVS products, equipment, and services; and this using technical, organizational and customer knowledge to influence customers and assist them in applying our products and services to their needs, resulting in revenue generation. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Technical Trainer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — our small and growing documentation and training team has an immediate need for a new member with intermediate-to-senior experience in: Instructional design, development of learning curricula, production of training materials, and hands-on, customer facing training. Generally, the training department, technical staff, and operations staff provide training at the customer’s site. We need an instructional designer and trainer who can analyze the learners and materials, and establish an appropriately targeted learning program. The opportunity exists to develop computer based training as an enhancement to our learning curriculum. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot, Boston, Massachusetts — we are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

System Specialist, Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking tech-savvy, passionate System Specialist to be based in our Toronto office! This position will be responsible for a wide range of projects to include end-to-end election simulations, identifying new features for development, coming up with creative solutions to meet customer needs; and documenting procedures and solutions. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus target & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Specialist, Wake County, North Carolina — the Wake County Board of Elections is seeking a Training Specialist to manage the training program for our 2,500+ election officials. This position will oversee the daily operation of the training program for the department, develop training materials, manage the Learning Management System, schedule and design layouts for training facilities, train and manage instructors and assistants for in-person training classes, identify training needs, and establish plans to address the needs through training solutions, identify innovative training tools and methods to enhance the training program, monitor and assess election law changes and incorporate the changes into polling place procedures, and develop and design election forms, precinct official website, newsletters, assessments, and other communications. Salary: $18.98 -$25.62/hr, eligible for overtime. Deadline: May 31, 2017. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 


 X. Marketplace
electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dominion Voting Equipment
Pierce County, Washington has the following used voting equipment for sale/surplus. If you are interested in purchasing any or all of the equipment please contact Pierce County with an offer.

Pierce County Elections
Damon Townsend
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.253-798-2146

If interested please respond by June 9.

Purchase subject to seller approval/reserve.

You may bid on a single unit of equipment, a portion of the equipment or on all items. County reserves right to award to one or multiple bidders. Award will be based upon those offers that provide the best overall price and benefit to the county.

Pictures available upon request.

Description Quantity Condition
Dominion/Sequoia 400C Central Count Tabulator 10

Excellent

Last Used: November 2016

Last PM: Fall 2016

Dominion/Sequoia 4C Central Count Tabulator 2 Parts or suitable for upgrade
Dominion/Sequoia 400C – Blue Cart 20 Excellent

Dominion/Sequoia

Edge 2 Direct Recording Electronic with VVPAT and audio

88

Good

Last Used: November 2016

Dominion/Sequoia

Edge 2 Direct Recording Electronic

with VVPAT and audio

35

Need Repair

Dominion/Sequoia

Card Activators

121

Excellent

Last Used: November 2016

Dominion/Sequoia

Memory Pack Reader

Insight

1 or 3 Good

Blue Voting Booths

(Make 2 booths)

100

Good

Ballot Box for insight 5

Excellent

 

 


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Because of the generosity of such organizations as The Pew Charitable Trusts, Democracy Fund and the Hewlett Foundation we were able to bring you that news and information for free and free of advertising.

In order to continue providing you with the important news of the day and week we are now offering monthly underwriting for our daily and weekly postings (think more NPR, less local radio and television).

Underwriting will be available for electionlineToday, the weekly email that reaches about 4,800 inboxes each week and the weekly newsletter. Underwriting is available on a per-month basis and costs $2,500 per section per month. The underwriting is available on a first come, first-served basis. Each section will be exclusive to one underwriter per month.

We will accept underwriting from a variety of entities in the elections world, but will not accept political advertising.

Job posting and marketplace listings from elections offices seeking to sell/trade voting equipment will remain free of charge.

Reservations are now available. If you are interested in underwriting a section of election for a month (or more), please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.